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bar

1) n. collectively all attorneys, as "the bar," which comes from the bar or railing which separates the general spectator area of the courtroom from the area reserved for judges, attorneys, parties and court officials. A party to a case or criminal defendant is "before the bar" when he/she is inside the railing. 2) v. to prevent some legal maneuver, as in "barring" a lawsuit due to the running of the time to file. 3) to prohibit and keep someone from entering a room, building, or real property.

bar

(Body of lawyers), noun advocates, attorneys, attorneys-at-law, barristers, counsel, counselors, jurists, lawyers, the legal fraternity, legal profession, legists, solicitors
Associated concepts: bar association, member of the bar

bar

(Court), noun assize, bench, court of justice, court of law, curia, forum, judicature, judiciary, seat of justice, sessions, tribunal
Associated concepts: bar of justice

bar

(Obstruction), noun balk, ban, barricade, barrier, block, blockage, circumscription, constraint, curb, difficulty, embargo, enjoining, estoppel, exclusion, forbiddance, forestalling, hindrance, hurdle, impediment, infarction, injunction, interdict, interference, limit, nonadmission, noninclusion, obstacle, preclusion, prevention, prohibition, proscription, refusal, rejection, stoppage, stopper, stumbling block, suppression
Associated concepts: bar by former judgment, estoppel

bar

(Exclude), verb ban, blacklist, circumscribe, debar, deny, disallow, except, exile, forbid, interdict, keep out, leave out, limit, lock out, occlude, omit, ostracize, outlaw, preclude, prevent, prohibit, refuse, reject, relegate, restrict, shut out, spurn, suspend

bar

(Hinder), verb avert, barricade, block, blockade, bolt, bridle, choke, choke off, curb, embar, enjoin, erect a barrier, estop, fasten, fence, forbid, foreclose, frustrate, hamper, impede, inhibit, interfere with, obstruct, obviate, occlude, preclude, prevent, prohibit, proscribe, put an embargo on, put one's veto upon, repress, restrain, retard, seal, secure, shut off, stand in the way, stay, stop, thwart, trammel
See also: abrogate, balk, ban, banish, barrier, bench, block, blockade, censor, censorship, clog, close, condemn, constrain, constraint, court, cudgel, damper, debar, deport, deter, disable, disapprobation, disqualify, eliminate, embargo, enjoin, estop, estoppel, exclude, exclusion, forbid, halt, hamper, impasse, impediment, inhibit, interdict, interfere, interruption, judiciary, keep, key, lock, obstruct, obstruction, obviation, occlude, oppose, outlaw, preclude, prevent, prohibit, prohibition, proscribe, refuse, relegate, remove, rescind, resist, restrain, restraint, restrict, restriction, save, seal, shut, stall, stay, stifle, stop, thwart, veto

bar

1 the area in a court of law separating the part reserved for the bench and Queen's Counsel from the area occupied by junior barristers, solicitors, and the general public.
2 the place in a court of law where the accused stands during his trial.
3 the professional body of pleaders before the High Courts in England: BARRISTERS.
4 in Parliamentary procedure, in the House of Lords and House of Commons, the boundary where nonmembers wishing to address either House appear and where persons are arraigned.
5 a plea showing that a plaintiff has no cause of action, as when the case has already been adjudicated upon or the time allowed for bringing the action has passed or through his actions the claimant can be said to have given up his claim.

BAR, actions. A perpetual destruction or temporary taking away of the action of the plaintiff. In ancient authors it is called exceptio peremptorid. Co. Litt. 303 b Steph. Pl. Appx. xxviii. Loisel (Institutes Coutumieres, vol. ii. p. 204) says, "Exceptions (in pleas) have been called bars by our ancient practitioners, because, being opposed, they arrest the party who has sued out the process, as in war (une barriere) a barrier arrests an enemy; and as there have always been in our tribunals bars to separate the advocates from the judges, the place where the advocates stand (pour parler) when they speak, has been called for that reason (barreau) the bar."
     2. When a person is bound in any action, real or personal, by judgment on demurrer, confession or verdict, he is barred, i. e. debarred, as to that or any other action of the like nature or degree, for the same thing, forever; for expedit reipublicae ut sit finis litim.
     3. But there is a difference between real and personal actions.
     4. In personal actions, as in debt or account, the bar is perpetual, inasmuch as the plaintiff cannot have an action of a higher nature, and therefore in such actions he has generally no remedy, but by bringing a writ of error. Doct. Plac. 65; 6 Co. 7, 8 4 East, 507, 508.
     5. But if the defendant be barred in a real action, by judgment on a verdict, demurrer or confession, &c., he may still have an action of a higher nature, and try the same right again. Lawes, Pl. 39, 40. See generally, Bac. Ab. Abatement, N; Plea in bar. Also the case of Outram v. Morewood, 3 East, Rep. 346-366; a leading case on this subject.

BAR, practice. A place in a court where the counsellors and advocates stand to make their addresses to the court and jury; it is so called because formerly it was closed with a bar. Figuratively the counsellors and attorneys at law are called the bar of Philadelphia, the New York bar.
     2. A place in a court having criminal jurisdiction, to which prisoners are called to plead to the indictment, is also called, the bar. Vide Merl. Repert. mot Barreau, and Dupin, Profession d'Avocat, tom. i. p. 451, for some eloquent advice to gentlemen of the bar.

BAR, contracts. An obstacle or opposition. 2. Some bars arise from circumstances, and others from persons. Kindred within the prohibited degree, for example, is a bar to a marriage between the persons related; but the fact that A is married, and cannot therefore marry B, is a circumstance which operates as a bar as long as it subsists; for without it the parties might marry.

References in periodicals archive ?
He begins by opening a big freezer cabinet behind the bar where the most popular gins (Bombay Sapphire, Tanquerey or Plymouth Navy Strength 108 proof) and vodkas (Belvedere, Potashki from Poland) are stored along with the glassware.
RAISING THE BAR The ideas behind DNA bar coding have been percolating as long as Hebert has been a population geneticist.
They assume a stance with feet shoulder-width apart, shins slightly touching the bar, and the arms extended straight down from the shoulders.
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For its part, the bar insists that it does not discriminate and that the patrons were denied entry for other reasons.
An operator aims the pen's light beam at the bar code and moves it across the label.
If the bar passes, the melting department says, "See, we told you we were right
CE[bar]ram Software are now ramping up their program-based solutions through their newly announced product roadmap which will likely raise the bar higher for competitors.
PALMDALE - The owners of a bar that, in 2001, was the scene of a shooting and fatal stabbing have agreed to close the business, settling a city lawsuit that sought to shutter the bar as a public nuisance.
To increase your odds of picking more fruit, make sure that the bar contains at least ten percent of the Daily Value (DV) for vitamins A or C.
A crossover book that appeals equally to business and general audiences, Raising The Bar ($19.
The city is asking a Palmdale Superior Court judge to declare JB's Bar at Palmdale Boulevard and 35th Street East a public nuisance and to prohibit the bar from operating without city permits, which the City Council voted last spring to deny.