pillory

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pillory

verb accuse, asperse, attaint, befoul, belittle, berate, besmear, besmirch, bespatter, blacken, blot, brand, bring shame upon, calumniate, cast a slur upon, cast asperrions on, cause a scandal, damage a reputation, debase, defame, defile, degrade, denigrate, denounce, destroy a reputation, discredit, disgrace, dishonor, disparage, expose to infamy, gibbet, give a bad name, hold up to ridicule, hold up to shame, impute shame to, lampoon, laugh at, lower, make fun of, malign, mock, put in a bad light, put to shame, ridicule, run down, scandalize, scorn, smear, smirch, soil, spatter, speak ill of, stain, stigmatize, sully, taint, tarnish, traduce, vilify, vituperate
See also: brand, condemn, defame, denigrate, denounce, disgrace, dishonor, smear

PILLORY, punishment. wooden machine in which the neck of the culprit is inserted.
     2. This punishment has been superseded by the adoption of the penitentiary system in most of the states. Vide 1 Chit. Cr. Law, 797. The punishment of standing in the pillory, so far as the same was provided by the laws of the United States, was abolished by the act of congress of February 27, 1839, s. 5. See Baxr. on the Stat. 48, note.

References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, the success of the pillory depended upon the participation of a baying mob; not every offender was so abused.
The most intriguing example of a solo performance is the case of John Lilburn, who used his time in the pillory to demonstrate his own suffering while expounding upon the beliefs that brought him there.
But it says even less for an audience that would probably have been first in the queue to throw rotten vegetables at poor souls locked in the pillory.
The authors demonstrate that the pillory underwent a revival after 1750 to punish sexual assault, homosexuality and deceit, while the stocks were still used in Berwick until the mid nineteenth-century.
David Benson, `Piers Plowman as poetic pillory: the pillory and the cross'; Elizabeth Fowler, `The empire and the waif: consent and conflict in the Man of Law's Tale'; David Aers, `Chaucer's Tale of Melibee: whose virtues?