Going Public

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Going Public

Altering the organization of a corporation from ownership and control by a small group of people, as in a close corporation, to ownership by the general public, as in a publicly held corporation.

When a corporation goes public, it opens up the sale of shares of its stock to the public at large.

References in periodicals archive ?
DAVID Cameron claimed expenses for a mortgage in Oxfordshire and took public cash to cut the wisteria off his chimney.
It will be the first meeting since the two sides took public shots at each another after talks went off the rails last week.
Researchers found that children who were driven to school, or who took public transport, had poorer concentration levels than those who took a more active route such as walking or cycling, the Daily Mail reported.
The Environmental Protection Agency took public comment in Dallas on Friday on its new rules for greenhouse gas regulations.
Singing protest songs and walking in procession 60 gay and straight couples took public commitment vows January 22 at the Unitarian Universalist Church to protest proposed bans on same-sex marriage in Virginia and Maryland.
Those decision makers involved in its collapse should apologise - they are publicly accountable, and it is about time they took public opinion into account by saying sorry.
In simple terms, the man who was supposed to save film industry jobs in Los Angeles by making it easier to set up location shooting took public money and gave it to his bosses who looked the other way when he spent more public money lavishly on himself.
He brings a great depth and knowledge to Giles Foods Ltd having previously been at the helm of Geest Plc for 15 years, a company he took public in 1986.
It took public outcry from groups such as Public Citizen, individual lawsuits, as well as a suit filed by the Center for Auto Safety, to get a bill passed giving the NHTSA more authority to investigate and hold automobile makers accountable.
BancBoston analyst Sheryl Skolnick took public assisted living companies to task for positioning themselves as growth stocks when the most they can hope for are nursing homelike earnings of 5 to 7 percent.
During that time Lytle built, took public and sold Acordia, Inc.