toxic

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toxic

adjective damaging, deadly, deleterious, fatal, festering, harmful, injurious, insalubrious, lethal, malign, noxious, pestilent, pernicious, poisonous, purulent, risky, unsafe, venomous, virulent
Associated concepts: toxic chemicals, toxic dementia, toxic ingredients, toxic psychosis, toxic torts
See also: deadly, deleterious, detrimental, fatal, harmful, insalubrious, lethal, malignant, noxious, peccant, pernicious, pestilent, virulent
References in periodicals archive ?
It is legal and common practice for manufacturers to add toxic chemicals to children's products.
Toxic Free then details ways you can "be your own toxicologist," which is especially important to parents as "infants and children have greater risk for health effects from toxic exposure than adults.
This is the most detailed toxic site map ever made publicly available for New York City," said Walter Hang, Toxics Targeting's president.
When voters approved the Toxics Right to Know law in 1996, it was aimed squarely at large manufacturers.
At a public meeting to discuss cleanup operations at the Simi Hills facility, Gerard Abrams, project manager for the California Department of Toxic Substances Control, said Thursday night that the highest concentrations of dioxins were found in the old burn pits and wastewater ponds that drain into Bell and Dayton Canyon creeks.
Since the beginning of the program, there have been steady declines in toxic chemicals released in the U.
Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.
Conversely, most people would say vitamins are "good," without realizing that many vitamins can be toxic at high dosages.
Given the environmental risks of the toxic chemicals used in most manufacturing processes, the arrival of Intel four years ago was widely debated by activist groups both in Costa Rica and abroad.
The EPA's revised definition actually meant total TRI-reported waste increased between 1991 and 1993, leaving the public with the highly misleading impression that ever-escalating mountains of toxic chemicals were poisoning the environment.
In yet a third pattern, sources of toxic pollution were placed in existing minority communities.
EPA Administrator William Reilly said that by the end of 1992, "EPA will have put into place a toxics program that will achieve greater reduction by the end of 1995 than EPA has been able to accomplish in the past 10 years.