Treatise


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Treatise

A scholarly legal publication containing all the law relating to a particular area, such as Criminal Law or Land-Use Control.

Lawyers commonly use treatises in order to review the law and update their knowledge of pertinent case decisions and statutes.

See: hornbook
References in classic literature ?
I am not now writing a treatise, but simply prefacing a somewhat peculiar narrative by observations very much at random; I will, therefore, take occasion to assert that the higher powers of the reflective intellect are more decidedly and more usefully tasked by the unostentatious game of draughts than by a the elaborate frivolity of chess.
You talk like a treatise on logic, and English logic into the bargain
We see an instance of Coleridge's liability to err, in his 'Biographia Literaria'--professedly his literary life and opinions, but, in fact, a treatise de omni scibili et quibusdam aliis.
At the age of twenty-one he wrote a treatise upon the Binomial Theorem, which has had a European vogue.
The Politics of Aristotle is the second part of a treatise of which the Ethics is the first part.
There was no doubt that he was a fine scholar, and he was engaged on a work which was quite in the right tradition: he was writing a treatise on the trees in Latin literature; but he talked of it flippantly, as though it were a pastime of no great importance, like billiards, which engaged his leisure but was not to be considered with seriousness.
Holmes and I sat together in silence all the evening, he engaged with a powerful lens deciphering the remains of the original inscription upon a palimpsest, I deep in a recent treatise upon surgery.
But the whole thickness of some learned counsel's treatise upon Torts did not screen him satisfactorily.
Whatever was not problematical and suspected about this young man--for example, a certain showiness as to foreign ideas, and a disposition to unsettle what had been settled and forgotten by his elders-- was positively unwelcome to a physician whose standing had been fixed thirty years before by a treatise on Meningitis, of which at least one copy marked "own" was bound in calf.
Did not his qualifications, his membership, and the record of his writings fill a long half-column in the "Medical Directory," from his first little paper on the "Gouty Diathesis" in 1859 to his exhaustive treatise upon "Affections of the Vaso-Motor System" in 1884?
Consequently, and to indulge his own idea of happiness, Cornelius began to be interested in the study of plants and insects, collected and classified the Flora of all the Dutch islands, arranged the whole entomology of the province, on which he wrote a treatise, with plates drawn by his own hands; and at last, being at a loss what to do with his time, and especially with his money, which went on accumulating at a most alarming rate, he took it into his head to select for himself, from all the follies of his country and of his age, one of the most elegant and expensive, -- he became a tulip-fancier.
Three other things he did during the same period: he wrote his famous treatise, Human Morals, his remarkable brochure, The Criminal Sane, and he worked out his awful and monstrous scheme of revenge.