unanticipated

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The unintended consequences of this program was it was so successful the wait line by all the users was worse than the prior method of ordering.
UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCE --Because you have nothing around which to train, you end up with way too many failed producer hires.
A further unintended consequence is that if public services reduce dramatically, the chances of attracting further, much needed private sector investment to the region will diminish.
To the credit of my district, the discovery and gradual understanding of these unintended consequences has led the district to begin to consider other ways to determine service delivery so there is a closer alignment between the operational needs of schools and the district's strategic work.
The Law of Unintended Consequences, alive and well, ensured that the risk was mispriced and the spread between rates on safe and risky securities narrowed to only a couple of percentage points.
Fundamentally, the authors don't have much of a grasp of what they mean by unintended consequences.
I have not heard the same alarm bells over nanotechnology, and I am beginning to wonder whether the nanotech community, although well-intended, might be forgetting the law of unintended consequences.
In managing this one specific risk--currency risk, per se--SAA failed to see, ignored or was otherwise not knowledgeable enough to foresee the future unintended consequences of its actions.
Unintended consequences can be chalked up to the world's inherent complexity and, more embarrassingly, to ignorance, self-deception-or plain old biases.
Baylor has had great success with its program, and encountered many of the same issues, challenges and unintended consequences outlined by Delage.
From Welfare to Workfare: The Unintended Consequences of Liberal Reform, 1945-1965.
banking and thrift agencies proceed with the deliberative process for implementing Basel II, it is important that the new capital framework does not produce unintended consequences, such as significant reductions in overall capital levels or the creation of substantial new competitive inequities between certain categories of insured depository institutions.