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inn

see HOTEL.

INN. A house where a traveller is furnished with every thing he has occasion for while on his way. Bac. Ab. Inns. B; 12 Mod. 255; 3 B. & A. 283; 4 Campb. 77; 2 Chit. Rep. 484; 3 Chit. Com. Law, 365, n. 6.
     2. All travellers have a lawful right to enter an inn for the purpose of being accommodated. It has been held that an innkeeper in a town through which lines of stages pass, has no right to, exclude the driver of one of these lines from his yard and the common public rooms, where travellers are usually placed, who comes there at proper hours, and in a proper manner, to solicit passengers for his coach, and without doing any injury to the innkeeper. 8 N. H. R. 523; Hamm. N. P. 170. Vide Entry; Guest.

References in periodicals archive ?
Already in September 1993, the commercialization of the internet on the consumer side unleashed what was known in early Usenet groups as "eternal September.
We're always looking forward to offering our members the best possible USENET experience.
The reason officially given typically is the decline in the popularity of Usenet as users have found other ways to communicate online.
But discussion on Usenet is text based, and other online communication and community-building technologies have come along with more graphical pizzazz.
Created in 1979, Usenet is in many respects still the town square of the Internet.
This is still the Usenet culture even though its scope has broadened immensely.
The newsgroup system WebUseNet has designed for BellSouth will give their Internet service customers who access UseNet the highest level of service," said Dwight Ringdahl, president/CEO of WebUseNet.
The MyDeja service, which allowed customized Usenet services and alerts along with free e-mail, is partially restored so that users may access their mailboxes.
Other groups: Last but not least, besides accounting and tax-related groups, a vast number of Usenet groups exist on every imaginable topic.
The program connects to your Internet service provider's Usenet news server and then automatically collates a series of 'newsgroups' which contain various pictures.
Nevertheless based on these responses it is possible to make some general observations about how Parliamentarians are using e-mail, the World Wide Web and Usenet newsgroups.
UUENCODE Stands for "Unix To Unix Encoding"and is the most common way to send pictures sound and even text as a series of numbers over e-mail and Usenet.