public utility

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public utility

n. any organization which provides services to the general public, although it may be privately owned. Public utilities include electric, gas, telephone, water, and television cable systems, as well as streetcar and bus lines. They are allowed certain monopoly rights due to the practical need to service entire geographic areas with one system, but they are regulated by state, county and/or city public utility commissions under state laws. (See: monopoly)

References in periodicals archive ?
Utility companies are looking to increase their investments in software and services in 2015, compared to 2014, to evolve their services at par with the industrialized nature of global economy.
Most utility companies operate under an Act of Parliament which gives them statutory powers to acquire a wayleave or easement for the installation, maintenance and retention of apparatus.
CRM has become critical because it's the underlying premise of the new delivery model that utility companies are taking," says Bob Zabors, a founding partner at consultancy Bridge Strategy Group.
That's a crucial feature given that utility companies are typically wary of new technology.
Since 2002 the average price of natural gas offered by local utility companies has risen by more than 40 percent.
New measures to tackle street works were introduced last year to allow local councils to fine utility companies who overstay their welcome up to pounds 2,000 a day.
Schnoor says their input, acceptance and eventually the revenue they'll receive from utility companies would do far more to decrease atmospheric carbon than simple legislation.
Special Rates - Almost all utility companies offer special rates that apply to foundry operations.
Public utility companies also can provide telecommunications services, but they will be required to do so through separate corporate entities.
While these problem scenarios may seem a bit extreme, they occur more often than they should, because many local governments do not have a concise, coherent policy to control the work of utility companies in the public rights-of-way.
On February 25, 1991, Tax Executives Institute filed comments with the Internal Revenue Service on the application of the normalization requirements of sections 167(l) and 168(i)(9) of the Code to utility companies that file consolidated federal income tax returns.

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