Volstead Act


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Related to Volstead Act: 18th Amendment, 21st Amendment

Volstead Act

Volstead Act is the popular name for the National Prohibition Act (41 Stat. 305), a comprehensive statute that was enacted to enforce the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and to prohibit the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors. The act was rendered inoperative by passage of the Twenty-First Amendment, which repealed Prohibition.

References in periodicals archive ?
Hollywood owes some of its greatest movies to the Volstead Act.
15) The Volstead Act was enacted in 1919 to provide enforcement for the Eighteenth Amendment, prohibiting the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages.
Federal enforcement of the Volstead Act was severely underfunded and understaffed.
They could decline to pass their own versions of the Volstead Act (as Maryland did), repeal them (as a dozen states, including Colorado and Washington, did while the 18th Amendment was still in force), or simply refrain from prosecuting people under them (which was common in the wetter districts of the country).
From these early plantings after the repeal of the Volstead Act in 1933, Herman and Ernest Wente released the nation's first varietally labeled Chardonnay, a 1936 vintage.
The Volstead Act was designed to stop anti-social behaviour by banning people from enjoying alcohol.
The 18th Amendment, ratified in 1919, went into effect the following year, with its enforcement spelled out in the fed eral Volstead Act.
In 1920, the Volstead Act allowed the production of sacramental wine, which caused a boom in church wine during Prohibition.
The Badger Brewing Company was doomed, however, as the Eighteenth Amendment and subsequent Volstead Act of 1919 banned the production, sale and distribution of "intoxicating liquors.
The notorious Volstead Act, named after US Congressman Andrew Volstead, was passed in 1919.
The idea of "preventative justice," as Roscoe Pound dubbed it, and of reforming the individual has its clearest expression in passage of the Eighteenth Amendment and the Volstead Act, which made it a federal crime to manufacture, transport, or distribute alcoholic spirits (S.
The Volstead Act eventually had 67 separate sections.