way

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Related to Way of the Cross: Stations of the Cross, Via Dolorosa

way

(Channel), noun alley, artery, avenue, custom, lane, mode, path, pathway, plan, road, roadway, route, throughway

way

(Manner), noun behavior, fashion, habit, means, progression, ritual
Associated concepts: way appurtenant, way by dedication, way of necessity, way reserved, wayfarer, waylay
See also: access, admission, admittance, arrangement, avenue, behavior, channel, condition, conduct, conduit, course, custom, demeanor, deportment, direction, entry, expedient, facility, form, habit, instrumentality, key, manner, method, mode, modus operandi, ploy, practice, presence, procedure, process, solution, state, style, system, temperament, treatment

WAY, estates. A passage, street or road. A right of way is a privilege which an individual or a particular description of persons, such as the inhabitants of a particular place, or the owners or occupiers of such place may have, of going over another person's ground.
     2. It is an incorporeal hereditament of a real nature, a mere easement, entirely different from public or private roads.
     3. A right of way may arise, 1. By prescription and immemorial usage. 2 McCord, 447 5 Har. & John. 474; Co. Litt. 113, b; Br. Chem. 2; 1 Roll. Ab. 936. 2. By grant. 3 Lev. 305; 1 Ld. Raym. 75; 17 Mass. 416; Crabb on R. P. Sec. 366. 3. By reservation 4. By custom. 5. By acts of the legislature. 6. From necessity, when a man's ground is enclosed and completely blocked up, so that he cannot, without passing over his neighbor's land, reach the public road. For example, should A grant a piece of land to B, surrounded by land belonging to A; a right of way over A's land passes of necessity to B, otherwise he could not derive any benefit from the acquisition. Vide 3 Rawle, 495; 2 Fairf. R. 1,56; 2 Mass. 203; 2 McCord, 448; 3 McCord, 139; 2 Pick. 577; 14 Mass. 56; 2 Hill, S. C. R. 641; and Necessity. The way is to be taken where it will be least injurious to the owner. 4 Kent, Com. 338. 4. Lord Coke, adopting the civil law, says there are three kinds of ways. 1. A foot-way, called iter. 2. A foot-way and horse-way, called adus. 3. A cart- way, which contains the other two, called via. Co. Lit. 56, a; Pothier, Pandectae, lib. 8, t. 3, Sec. 1; Dig. 8, 3; 1 Bro. Civ. Law, 177. Vide Yelv. 142, n; Id. 164; Woodf. Landl. & Ten. 544; 4 Kent, Com. 337; Ayl. Pand. 307; Cruise's Dig. tit. 24; 1 Taunt. R. 279; R. & M. 151; 1 Bail. R. 58; 2 Hill. Abr. c. 6; Crabb on Real Prop. Sec. 360 to 397; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; Easement; Servitude.

References in periodicals archive ?
They draw me into the story and invite me--force me--to think about how the Way of the Cross bears on my life, how the pain, indignities, kindnesses, and insults that Jesus experienced are repeated daily, even in the world that he saved.
In reaction the Franciscans, who had been the guardians of the Holy Land's holy sites, recreated those places in Europe to meditate on Christ's Way of the Cross.
Responding to a desire for a more gospel-based devotion, Pope John Paul II introduced the scriptural Way of the Cross, which included 14 events depicted in the biblical accounts.