Week


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WEEK. Seven days of time.
     2. The week commences immediately after twelve o'clock, on the night between Saturday and Sunday, and ends at twelve o'clock, seven days of twenty-four hours each thereafter.
     3. The first day of the week is called Sunday; (q.v.) the second, Monday; the third, Tuesday; the, fourth, Wednesday; the fifth, Thursday; the sixth, Friday; and the seventh, Saturday. Vide 4 Pet. S. C. Rep. 361.

References in classic literature ?
For fully a week they were quite blissfully happy, thinking that belonging to a union meant an end to all their troubles.
Now it seems to me unfair, Dowley, and a deadly peril to all of us, that because you thoughtlessly confessed, a while ago, that within a week you have paid a cent and fifteen mil --"
Five little weeks will soon be fled: One scarcely will have time to wink
She could not live any longer in such solitary wretchedness; and she made her way to the Park, through difficulties of walking which she had deemed unconquerable a week before, for the chance of hearing a little in addition, for the sake of at least hearing his name.
Then the time limited for his absence would be a week.
He left a message that he was in London for a week, and would be glad if you would dine with him tomorrow at his club.
She was to be their chosen visitor, she was to be for weeks under the same roof with the person whose society she mostly prized -- and, in addition to all the rest, this roof was to be the roof of an abbey
Fraulein Hedwig was gone, and Weeks, the American who generally accompanied them on their rambles, had set out for a tour of South Germany.
A sea trip does you good when you are going to have a couple of months of it, but, for a week, it is wicked.
One day, during the last week of my stay in the restaurant, I found under one of the tables a crisp, new ten-dollar bill.
With his knowledge of languages, the respect shown him by the French, his simplicity, his readiness to give anything asked of him (he received the allowance of three rubles a week made to officers); with his strength, which he showed to the soldiers by pressing nails into the walls of the hut; his gentleness to his companions, and his capacity for sitting still and thinking without doing anything (which seemed to them incomprehensible), he appeared to them a rather mysterious and superior being.
Last week he made all us third-class boys write a composishun on what kind of a wife we'd like to have and the girls on what kind of a husband.