area

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Related to Wernicke's area: Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke's aphasia, Broca's area, Wernicke's syndrome

area

(Province), noun area, arena, bounds, confines, demesne, domain, expanse, field, jurisdiction, limits, orbit, place, premises, purview, range, realm, region, scope, sphere, territory, vicinage, vicinity, zone
Associated concepts: area variance, specific areas of the law

area

(Surface), noun amount of surface, dimensions, expanse, expansion, extent of surface, measured size, measurements, plane surface, proportions, real size, true dimensions
See also: bailiwick, caliber, capacity, circuit, department, dimension, district, division, extent, locality, location, measurement, parcel, part, place, province, purview, range, realm, region, scope, section, space, sphere, territory, vicinity, zone

AREA. An enclosed yard or opening in a house; an open place adjoining to a house. 1 Chit. Pr. 176.

References in periodicals archive ?
It is known that the left insula cortex forms an anatomical bridge between Broca and Wernicke's areas, that most speech functions involve the dorsal left anterior insula, and that damage to the left insula contributes to dyspraxia (Ingham et al.
From there the stimuli are transmitted along the auditory nerve to the brain stem from which fibers radiate out into Heschle's gyrus and then on to Wernicke's area.
The finding matters, Rauschecker said, because the new location of Wernicke's area matches that recently found in non-human primates, suggesting the origins of language between monkeys and humans is closer than many have thought, he asserted.
Wernicke's aphasia corresponds to lesions found in Wernicke's area of the brain.
Wernicke's area also has massive connections through the arcuate fasciculus with Broca's area (B), which tends to show later peaks of activation in language tasks (Thierry, Boulanouar, Kherif, Ranjeva, & Demonet, 1999).
Broca's area, related to speech production, and Wernicke's area, associated with comprehending speech, were supposed to be the two centers in the brain associated with verbal communication.
Native English speakers reading English sentences, as opposed to strings of consonants, display heightened activity in three regions of the brain's left hemisphere traditionally associated with language--Broca's area, Wernicke's area, and the angular gyrus--assert Daphne Bavelier of Georgetown University in Washington, D.
These regions include the inferior frontal gyrus, or Broca's area, in the front left side of the brain, and the posterior temporal region, commonly referred to as Wernicke's area, toward the back left side of the brain.
Wernicke's area, located in the temporal lobe and also known to perform language functions, displayed comparable responses in both groups.
Part of the visual cortex not mapped in the current study lies just below Wernicke's area, a structure involved in speech and language comprehension, according to Sereno.