white collar crime

(redirected from White-Collar Crimes)
Also found in: Financial.

white collar crime

n. a generic term for crimes involving commercial fraud, cheating consumers, swindles, insider trading on the stock market, embezzlement and other forms of dishonest business schemes. The term comes from the out of date assumption that business executives wear white shirts and ties. It also theoretically distinguishes these crimes and criminals from physical crimes, supposedly likely to be committed by "blue collar" workers.

References in periodicals archive ?
One of the problems with complicated white-collar crimes like offshore insurance schemes is that they are difficult to explain and difficult for some to see as real crimes.
This means that less than eight percent of white-collar crimes reached the proper authorities, according to the National Public Survey on White Collar Crime, a groundbreaking survey conducted by the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C), a nonprofit, Federally funded organization that supports state and local police in their efforts to prevent, investigate, and prosecute economic and high-tech crime.
FRAUD AND WHITE-COLLAR CRIMES are typically committed by older, better-educated offenders.
The authors make evident that white-collar crimes are a substantially greater hazard to the public than street crimes.
Second, let's consider that white-collar crimes are committed mostly by whites from the middle and upper classes and not by the poor and working classes, which contain a high percentage of black single-female-headed households.
The author, a 17-year veteran with the Austin, Texas, Police Department, presents information in an easy-to-follow manner on a subject of increasing importance to law enforcement as agencies devote more resources to investigating white-collar crimes.
The myths of the criminal type and the law-abiding majority together function as a sort of "master myth," from which a cluster of subsidiary myths serves to "explain away" as exceptional those especially egregious white-collar crimes that come to public attention.
The news is filled with reports of white-collar crimes.
In the litigation area, the firm provides investigatory accounting and fraud auditing for economic damage computation, lost profit, breach of contract, construction claims, and white-collar crimes.
Domestic violence and white-collar crimes are down.
Pickard's experience in fraud and other white-collar crimes has given him insights into what companies should do to protect themselves.
Although law enforcement officers traditionally have seized entire computer systems to investigate white-collar crimes, victims of computer manipulation cases usually cannot afford to have their businesses disrupted in this manner.