depression

(redirected from Winter depression)
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Related to Winter depression: Winter Blues, Seasonal depression

depression

noun debasement, decline, deflation, depreciation, despondence, despondency, dispiritedness, dolefulness, economic decline, gloom, lowering, lowness, maeror, sinking, slump
Associated concepts: economic depression
See also: anguish, curtailment, decrease, distress, pessimism, prostration
References in periodicals archive ?
Winter depression - known as seasonal affective disorder or SAD - is thought to affect as many as one in 15 people in the UK every year between September and April.
For the light source, the researchers used commercially available LEDs or a blue-light lamp that is used to combat winter depression.
It is thought that up to one in 15 of the UK population is affected by winter depression - or Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) - every year between September and April.
From winter depression to allergies, coughs, colds and flu, how do you keep yourself in tip top condition and feel on top of the world when the world seems so dreary and cold?
The 50-year-old Balsall Heath-born vocalist reveals that he suffers with Seasonal Affective Disorder - or SAD - a type of winter depression.
Up to a third of the population, in Britain at least, suffers from seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, also known as winter depression, according to MIND, a leading mental health charity in England and Wales.
The thing is, I think I'm beginning to suffer from seasonal affective disorder, the winter depression that affects half a million people every winter.
Among those who do not suffer themselves, 44 per cent said they know someone who does succumb to winter depression.
These companies can easily be found through the internet by using light therapy or winter depression as a prompt.
The longer nights, especially when we switch from Daylight Saving Time back to Standard, and lack of sunlight affect our circadian rhythms, interrupt our sleep cycles, and cause fatigue and winter depression.
Also called winter depression, SAD is a form of depression that affects an estimated 10 to 20 percent of Americans.
The researchers tested 24 people with winter depression, also known as seasonal-affective disorder (SAD).