matter

(redirected from a matter of course)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to a matter of course: come in handy, take account of, so much for

matter

(Case), noun action, causa, cause, cause in court, claim, court action, dispute, inquiry, lawsuit, legal accion, legal proceedings, litigation, pleadings, proceedings, suit, suit at law, trial
Associated concepts: matter of record

matter

(Subject), noun business on hand, case, case in question, claim, concern, debatable point, dispute, field of inquiry, institutum, issue, item on the agenda, point, point at issue, point in question, problem, proposition, propositum, question, res, subject for inquiry, subject matter, topic, topic for discussion
Associated concepts: immaterial matter, matter in controoersy, matter in dispute, matter in issue, matter in pais, matter of fact, matter of form, matter of law, matter of record, matter of substance, matters pending
Foreign phrases: Certa debet esse intentio, et narratio, et certum fundamentum, et certa res quae deducitur in juuicium.The intention, declaration, foundation, and matter brought to judgment ought to be certain. Eventus varios res nova semper habet. A new matter always holds the possibility of a different result. Culpa est immiscere se rel ad se non pertinenti. It is a fault for anyone to meddle in matters which do not concern him.
See also: affair, article, business, case, consequence, content, corpus, entity, gist, happening, import, issue, item, lawsuit, materiality, matter in dispute, meaning, object, particular, point, proceeding, significance, subject, substance

MATTER. Some substantial or essential thing, opposed to form; facts.

MATTER, IMPERTINENT, Equity pleading. That which is altogether irrelevant to the case, that does not appertain or belong to it; id est, qui ad rem non pertinet. 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 4163. See Impertinent.

MATTER, SCANDALOUS, equity pleading. A false and malicious statement of facts, not relevant to the cause. But nothing which is positively relevant, however harsh or gross the charge may be, can be considered scandalous. 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 4163.
     2. A bill cannot by the general practice, be referred for impertinence after the defendant has answered, or submitted to answer, but it may be referred for scandal at any time, and even upon the application of a stranger to the suit, for he has the right to prevent the records of the court from being made the vehicle of spreading slanders against himself. Id. n. 41f 64.

References in classic literature ?
As a matter of course, I was left alone with Betts Shoreham.
It was a matter of course that in drawing Indian character he should dwell on the better traits of the picture, rather than on the coarser and more revolting though more common points.
It had been agreed between us downstairs that after this first occasion I should have her as a matter of course at night, her small white bed being already arranged, to that end, in my room.
And especially would this seem to be a matter of course, in the case of vessels owned in one seaport, and whose captains, officers, and not a few of the men are personally known to each other; and consequently, have all sorts of dear domestic things to talk about.
They are elected annually, it is true; but their re-election is considered by the legislative assemblies almost as a matter of course.
Each now tried to out-boast and out-talk the other; a quarrel ensued as a matter of course, and a general fight, according to frontier usage.
On leaving the Ti, Kory-Kory, who had as a matter of course accompanied me, observing that my curiosity remained unabated, resolved to make everything plain and satisfactory.