abhorrence


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References in classic literature ?
In one thing, however, they showed superior judgment and self- command to most of their race; this was, in their abstinence from ardent spirits, and the abhorrence and disgust with which they regarded a drunkard.
I feel that I owe you my life," replied the girl in a quiet voice, "and while I am now positive that my father has entirely regained his sanity, and looks with as great abhorrence upon the terrible fate he planned for me as I myself, I cannot forget the debt of gratitude which belongs to you.
He felt a desire to see them, and also a dread and abhorrence of them; for a time he struggled and covered his eyes, but at length the desire got the better of him; and forcing them open, he ran up to the dead bodies, saying, Look, ye wretches, take your fill of the fair sight.
He took it and cast it back to me in abhorrence and contempt, with all the strength he could muster.
Not a single female was present but found some means of expressing her abhorrence of poor Jenny, who bore all very patiently, except the malice of one woman, who reflected upon her person, and tossing up her nose, said, "The man must have a good stomach who would give silk gowns for such sort of trumpery
But her husband's life, being written by a third hand, gives a full account of them both, how long they lived together in that country, and how they both came to England again, after about eight years, in which time they were grown very rich, and where she lived, it seems, to be very old, but was not so extraordinary a penitent as she was at first; it seems only that indeed she always spoke with abhorrence of her former life, and of every part of it.
But, the old abhorrence grew stronger on her as she grew weaker, and it found more sustaining food than she did in her wanderings.
But Judge Lancaster said the court had to impose a sentence which reflected society's abhorrence of the crime.
Politicians need to make clear their abhorrence of the racist views of the BNP.
Only a prison sentence is appropriate to mark the gravity and the public abhorrence of this offence
Is that really a sentence that reflects society's abhorrence at this type of offence?
The thought of a clinic being set up in Cardiff where such defenceless lives can be so easily destroyed, fills me with abhorrence.