ability


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ability

noun ableness, adaptability, adeptness, aptitude, aptness, capability, capacity, competence, competency, enablement, facultas, faculty, fitness, ingenium, mastership, mastery, potentiality, potestas, proficiency, prowess, skill, versatility
Associated concepts: ability to contract, ability to earn, abillty to pay, ability to perform, ability to provide, ability to purchase, ability to support, capacity, financial ability, readiness, testamentary ability
See also: aptitude, caliber, capacity, efficiency, facility, fitness, flair, force, gift, grade, performance, potential, proclivity, propensity, qualification, quality, science, skill, specialty, strength, technique
References in periodicals archive ?
The conventional wisdom that pervaded society until very recently is that men are naturally gifted with mathematical and scientific ability whereas women, due to a weaker mind, struggle to keep pace.
Despite these facts, differences in mathematical ability are still observable and documented, though the truth of the situation is far from the overtly sexist and overly simplistic notion that girls are bad at math.
However, the main focus in this article is the Ability Explorer (AE; Harrington & Harrington, 1996), a psychometric device for career counseling purposes that operationalizes 7 of the 14 propositions constituting Super's career development theory (Super, Savickas, & Super, 1996).
However, vocational scholars thought that all of these theories, except the work adjustment theory, neglected the concept of ability in career development theory (Savickas, 1994).
13, 1994, Wall Street Journal signed by 52 prominent intelligence researchers: "Intelligence is a very general mental capability," they write, "that, among other things, involves the ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend complex ideas, learn quickly, and learn from experience.
Many couples now meet at colleges or universities, where they have been pooled into groups of ascending cognitive ability.
This increase in cognitive stratification results from the realization of the meritocratic vision of access to institutions based on individual ability.
For example, they were asked to judge, on a scale of 1 to 5, their software's speed, printing, accuracy, price, technical support, release dates, practice management features, fixed assets and depreciation capabilities, training aids and manuals and ability to verify input.