abnegate

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as pictures behaving most often as verbs, as flashes of referential/nameable objects and beings, things, caught in maximum expression of movement; (3) accepts the disguises of said dream content as if it were of revelatory value, at least equal to the "true" identity of the remembered vision--keeping the interpretation of the dream in movement and fixed status at once in one's mind, thus abnegating normal causal logic, narrative dramatics, so forth, in sincere acceptance of the intrinsic timelessness of the imagined unconscious; and (4) insistently relates all this yield of personal memory to the essentially "overl ooked," unremarkable, barely noticed, initially disregarded whatever which sparked the dream, as one had, say, sidled by it on ones day-dreaming way.
West Mercia Police's Supt Simon Adams, divisional commander for Herefordshire, said: "Experience has taught us that I would be abnegating my responsibility to protect and police the community effectively if I had not made resources available to handle any incidents in the light of the high media profile being attributed to this event by animal rights campaigners, together with our knowledge of policing similar demonstrations in the past.
One chooses it knowing that, by that very decision, one is abnegating other possibilities.
Then we deny the conflict between the offender and society, abnegating punishment for "caring" and "correction.
They are in a double bind, unable to escape the demands of the hero figure without abnegating their masculinity and thus sacrificing the silent approbation of culture, yet often drawn by a sense of justice toward renunciation of hegemonic masculinity.
Captain Vere is held up as a model officer, absolutely faithful to his "vows of allegiance to martial duty" Abnegating his most compassionate, human feelings, he urges the officers of the drumhead court to impose a sentence of death on the foretopman, though all agree, and Captain Vere first of all, that he was falsely charged by Claggart.
Coleman demonstrates that Ellison's counter-aesthetics--his opposition to what he considered the deterministic and abnegating exigencies of protest and social realism--opened an artistic space for subsequent writers who adamantly eschewed the agit-prop literary imperatives championed by Wright.