abominate


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
See: contemn
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The accounts of his last days are very moving and although one may abominate what he stood for, he seemed remarkably serene and almost childlike, remaining convinced of the rightness of what he did to the end.
What they abominate about 'the West,' to put it in a phrase, is not what Western liberals don't like and can't defend about their own system, but what they do like about it and must defend: its emancipated women, its scientific inquiry, its separation of religion from the state.
Nor can there be any doubt that those who planned such terror have forfeited the right to live in a world they so clearly abominate and despise.
Both Waugh's determination to be a combatant and the revulsion with which he records the absurdities of the British army--he would, for example, speak of the British in Crete as "a pitiful spectacle" (Diaries 503) and confess to his wife, "I abominate military life" (Letters 153)--reveal that this global war was anything but a laughing matter to him.
But lest there by any doubt we make it clear that we abominate attacks by petrol bombs on dwelling houses which are fraught with risk and cannot be tolerated.
Vices that one sex will tolerate, both sexes, if together, will abominate and punish.
For example, he becomes, paradoxically, a model for those who would abominate child sacrifice.
They reciprocally accuse and despise one another, and they abominate and curse each other by turns until those among them who arrogate exclusive orthodoxy to themselves end up professing not love but systematic intolerance.
As he boards the Pequod unaware of his coming burdens, Ishmael muses that the life of the common sailor includes an attractive lack of responsibility, and for this reason he values it over the life of an officer: "For my part, I abominate all honorable respectable toils, trials, and tribulations of every kind whatsoever.
The passion in these conflicts comes mainly from two groups, fundamentalist Christians and scientific atheists, who feed off each other even as they abominate each other.
He declares to Elizabeth at the end of the novel, that "'Much as I abominate writing, I would not give up Mr.