abreaction


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
See: catharsis
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Discrete events often require catharsis and abreaction, but it is only in working-through, in the transference, and in the resistance that can unlock the underlying dynamic which girded and perpetuated the abuse and binds the client to that suffering in later life.
Satire, parody, absurdity, stark realism, and abreaction all became tools in the Modernist's at tempts to untangle social, moral, and spiritual "truths" The Modern artist manipulated objects and concepts in abstract ways to produce cosmic or chaotic reorganizations of our philosophical constructs.
The author outlines widely accepted essential features of this form of treatment: developing self-soothing techniques, mapping the system of alternate personalities, facilitating communication between alters and with the therapist, managing abreaction, and--when possible and appropriate--aiding the process of fusion.
The realization that everyone has a breaking point and the introduction of narcotherapy (the drug-facilitation of abreaction, the reliving of an experience in order to purge it of its emotional excess) for some cases of acute combat neurosis constituted major advances in the second phase of the world conflict, which began in 1939.
This may be called a flashback, reliving experience or abreaction.
Besides assisting in the recapturing of lost memories, Courtois (1999) lists other useful purposes in using hypnosis including the abreaction of the trauma, in the identification of and reconnection with disowned parts of the self, in pain management and substance control, and as a means of relaxation and self management.
Currently, less emphasis is given to abreaction of trauma and more to the pacing of treatment to avoid crises.
Bibring (cited in Glick & Meyerson, 1980) enumerates five technical principles of therapeutic intervention: suggestion, abreaction, clarification, manipulation, and interpretation.
AIDS may thus be seen not as a divine punishment, but as quite the opposite--as a defensive abreaction on the part of the species against the danger of a total promiscuity.
The notion that there exists in that emotional investment supreme satisfaction in replaying a scene of dissatisfaction might sound like the abreaction of collective repression of mass-pathological proportions (in terms of how ubiquitous digital gaming has become).
Women who have been exposed to long periods of prostitution activities reveal other symptoms such as cutting, abreaction and psychotic episodes.