absolute liability


Also found in: Medical, Financial.

absolute liability

a phrase to describe a case where liability attaches to a person on the happening of a given condition and despite any care that that person may have taken and despite any facts suggesting the happening was outside human foresight. It appears in some statutory crimes and civil duties.
References in periodicals archive ?
Otherwise known as Labor Law 240, the law puts absolute liability for workers' injured in a worksite fall on contractors and property owners when it is found that proper safety measures weren't in place.
In a typical transaction the applicant asks the issuing bank to assume absolute liability to pay the beneficiary under terms and conditions previously negotiated with the beneficiary.
Hailed as the pioneer of judicial activism, Bhagwati, during his tenure as a Supreme Court judge, introduced the concepts of public interest litigation (PIL) and absolute liability to the Indian judicial system.
Some have even suggested that absolute liability might apply beyond
Comparing Strict Absolute Liability to Scienter-Based Liability.
Through its formula for calculating the deduction, which involved adjustments based on historical redemption rates, the company had demonstrated to the court's satisfaction "the existence--as of year's end--of both an absolute liability and a near-certainty that the liability would soon be discharged by payment" (slip op.
The most significant changes to the Act relate to absolute liability and financial resource requirements, abandonment, pipeline releases, damage prevention, as well as audit and enforcement powers.
The law does not impose absolute liability on the operator of a water park, health club, activity park or other recreational facility whenever a customer is injured, however.
Legally, the concept of absolute liability will not usually apply.
It imposes a nondelegable, absolute liability on owners and general contractors for construction-related injuries, even though the liable party does not perform the work, supervise the work, or employ the injured worker.
He said he rated Mario's ability - but called him an absolute liability.
To make such lawsuits even more vexatious, NY Labor Law sections 240 and 241 impose absolute liability in certain situations on owners or general contractors even though the owners or general contractors had little real control over the work.