abstemiousness


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The transition, and slippage, between sacred and secular understandings of female abstemiousness is perhaps best evident in the competing interpretations of Isolt of Brittany's attenuation put forward by Tristram, her husband, and Queen Isolt, Tristram's lover.
I am like my father in many ways but I also absorbed most of my mother's traits of abstemiousness and simplicity.
But, oh, consider the tedium, as half the populace jump on the abstemiousness bandwagon, spewing their dreary recipes for 47 calorie soups all over the internet, tweeting their weight loss and feeling generally smug.
Had Camilla been incorporated into Aeneid narratives for the purpose of modeling female abstemiousness (a la Boccaccio), her effectiveness in this role would have been amplified through juxtaposition with Dido, a woman whom both Vegio and Landino considered a poster child of sexual immorality and pervasive intemperance.
And I held my head up high in church on Easter Sunday, knowing I'd been there with Jesus during his period of self-imposed abstemiousness - even if it was in slightly more comfortable surroundings.
Despite Leandre's exemplary abstemiousness, the play's other theatrical elements collude to seduce the audience with the visual pleasures of the Mediterranean setting.
This abstemiousness earned the prime minister and finance minister the lowest approval ratings of any since the restoration of democracy.
Careless to abstemiousness in her daily habits, it was part of her pride to set a feast before such of her guests as cared for it.
Thus was born her trust in "nature to do her own work by her own remedies" and her keen interest in hygiene, exercise, and abstemiousness.
She stood before a tatty display tracing the source of Gabrovian wit to a certain Old Minyo, a 19th-century local of fabled abstemiousness who was said to have carried his shoes on long walks, so as to spare their soles, and who sat in the dark to save candle wax.
However, in "The Hunger Artist," the story of a performer who declines even a piece of lemon, a virtuoso of abstemiousness who flaunts his ability to fast for weeks and months, Kafka elevates refusing to eat into a principle of aesthetics.