abstract

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Abstract

To take or withdraw from; as, to abstract the funds of a bank. To remove or separate. To summarize or abridge.

An abstract comprises—or concentrates in itself—the essential qualities of a larger thing—or of several things—in a short, abbreviated form. It differs from a transcript, which is a verbatim copy of the thing itself and is more comprehensive.

Cross-references

Abstract of Title.

abstract

n. in general, a summary of a record or document, such as an abstract of judgment or abstract of title to real property.

abstract

noun abbreviation, abbreviature, analect, brief, capsule, compendium, compilation, compression, condensation, consolidation, conspectus, contraction, digest, epitoma, epitome, extract, pandect, precis, reduction, summary, synopsis
Associated concepts: abstract idea, abstract of a record, abbtract of judgment, abstract of title, abstract proposition of law, abstracts of evidence, marketable title acts, title search

abstract

(Separate), verb detach, disengage, disjoin, dissociate, disunite, isolate, remove, take out of context

abstract

(Summarize), verb abbreviate, abridge, capsulize, compact, compress, condense, contract, reduce, shorten, synopsize, telescope
See also: abridgment, capsule, compendium, condense, delineation, digest, extract, hold up, intangible, lessen, moot, note, outline, recondite, restatement, review, rob, scenario, select, speculative, steal, summary, synopsis, theoretical, withdraw
References in periodicals archive ?
She also serves as an abstracter of Foi et Vie for Religious and Theological Abstracts.
1) Met de hantering van dit woord--al dan niet kwalificatief, maar altijd afgaand op gevoelens--refereert ook Coetzee naar de betrokkenheid van de Zuid-Afrikaners bij hun land, opgevat in de letterlijke betekenis van grond als ook als een groter en abstracter geheel.
ALTA's Abstracter and Title Agent Operations Survey noted that title problems were found in 36 percent of all residential real estate transactions--new and resale homes and refinances--in 2005, up from 25 percent in 2000.