Abstraction

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Abstraction

Taking from someone with an intent to injure or defraud.

Wrongful abstraction is an unauthorized and illegal withdrawing of funds or an appropriation of someone else's funds for the taker's own benefit. It may be a crime under the laws of a state. It is different from Embezzlement, which is a crime committed only if the taker had a lawful right to possession of the money when it was first taken.

See: concept, generality, idea, impalpability, larceny, notion, preoccupation, vision
References in periodicals archive ?
Abstractive summarization approaches use information extraction, ontological information, information fusion, and compression.
Other educators perceived it as a kind of professional knowledge that goes beyond the command of subject matter or general pedagogical principles to an understanding of how to transform the abstractive knowledge to a meaningful to learners (Wilson, Shulman, and Richert, 1987).
By, so to say, X-raying the abstractives and by proving their merely semiotic role in the process of cognition, Ockham establishes abstract knowledge as a system of propositions that functions solely in the space of metalinguistic investigation of extramental reality; as the source of all abstraction is supposed by Ockham to be intuition, on which rests also the evidential power of scientia, we can conclude that knowledge must, to have a grasp of reality, seize back and slide on the contingency of an individual manifested in the intuition (Schulthess and Imbach 1996:272-273).
This was evidence for a magical conception of objects rather than a rationalistic and abstractive use of numbers to refer to all objects.
In the event, his input to the exhibition comprises merely a few wall captions that are of no great perspicacity and a single room hung with some predictably chosen abstractive drawings.
Scientific concepts mediated by the teacher are logical and systematic, but their verbal or formulaic form is often too abstractive and detached from the students' own experience.
The individual who makes his approach to life through dialectic alone does violence to life through his abstractive process.
6) The futility of abstractive imagination becomes obvious, according to Amery, "when an event places the most extreme demands on us," because when it happens, "one ought not to speak of banality.
Because Hayek believes the mind is parsimonious in using higher mental processing levels, an entrepreneur wants to avoid frequent abstractive maneuvers.
Chapter ii argues that the Book of the Duchess calls into question the traditional epistemology of the `philosophical vision', exploring the nominalist idea that knowledge is attained via `intuitive cognition' of `singulars' rather than through a more traditional abstractive movement from singular to universal.
The methodologies employed range from traditional source studies (especially collations of multiple sources), to psychological theories of memory (both constructive and abstractive processes are considered), to "folkioristic" studies of the transmission of various oral literatures (Homeric, the Hindu Veda, and synagogue practices, inter alia).
Of course, Plato and Aristotle would seem to be adequate evidence that abstractive capacity is not alien to the European mind and to European culture.