abused


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abused

adjective aggrieved, debased, defamed, degraded, exploited, ill-used, injured, maltreated, mistreated, misused, oppressed, persecuted, victimized, wronged
Associated concepts: abused children
See also: aggrieved
References in periodicals archive ?
Reviews of recent research study on the parenting characteristics of women who were sexually abused as children explored the intergenerational transmission of abuse (cycle of abuse) and found that childhood sexual abuse survivors were more likely to use harsh physical discipline, to be more permissive as parents and have greater difficulties in establishing clear generational boundaries with their children (Dilillo and Damashek, 2003).
At the doctor's office, Tiffany reported that her father had sexually abused her, according to court records.
3 percent of high school seniors said they had abused the painkiller Vicodin in the past year.
Ask them if they think products that are abused as inhalants should carry warning labels, or if it should be against the law to sell products like computer cleaner to young people.
One reason is that states do not collect data about abused children in the same way.
Insofar as inhalant abuse is an international public health concern, epidemiological research should examine regional and cultural differences in the pattern of use and substances abused among various populations.
They conclude there is no intervention proven to reduce the risk of abuse or neglect when children who have been abused remain in the home.
Regardless of opinion, the fact remains, children continue to be neglected by their parents, sexually abused by family members and others, exploited, beaten, bullied, and emotionally abused in shocking numbers.
Used medicinally as an anesthetic, it is also widely abused as a drug.
Emotionally abused children are not as likely to be reported and do not receive the psychological services necessary for emotional healing and growth.
This at times brutal attack is not ancient history, but rather a modern phenomenon, the effects of which reverberate today in men, women and children struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, suicide, sexual abuse of all forms (some who've been abused have become abusers themselves), and almost boundless amounts of rage and sorrow.
Miller urges people who have been abused to reach out for counseling.