accrue

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Related to accrues: accruable

Accrue

To increase; to augment; to come to by way of increase; to be added as an increase, profit, or damage. Acquired; falling due; made or executed; matured; occurred; received; vested; was created; was incurred.

To attach itself to, as a subordinate or accessory claim or demand arises out of, and is joined to, its principal.

The term is also used of independent or original demands, meaning to arise, to happen, to come into force or existence; to vest, as in the phrase, "The right of action did not accrue within six years." To become a present right or demand; to come to pass.

Interest on money that a depositor has in a bank savings account accrues, so that after a certain time the amount will be increased by the amount of interest it has earned.

A Cause of Action, the facts that give a person a right to judicial relief, usually accrues on the date that the injury to the plaintiff is sustained. When the injury is not readily discoverable, the cause of action accrues when the plaintiff in fact discovers the injury. This occurs frequently in cases of Fraud or Malpractice. A woman, for example, has an appendectomy. Three years after the surgery, she still experiences dull pain on her right side. She is examined by another physician who discovers a piece of surgical sponge near the area of the operation. Although the injury had occurred at the time of surgery three years earlier, in this case the cause of action for Medical Malpractice accrues on the date that the sponge is discovered by the second doctor. This distinction is important for purposes of the running of the Statute of Limitations, the time set by law within which a lawsuit must be commenced after a cause of action accrues. In cases involving injuries that cannot be readily discovered, it would be unfair to bar a plaintiff from bringing a lawsuit because he or she does not start the suit within the required time from the date of injury.

accrue

v. 1) growing or adding to, such as interest on a debt or investment which continues to accumulate. 2) the coming into being of the right to bring a lawsuit. For example, the right to sue on a contract only accrues when the contract is breached (not mere suspicion that it might be breached) or when the other party repudiates the contract (anticipatory breach).

accrue

(Arise), verb acquire, be derived, become due, become enforceable, become present, come, emanate, ensue, eventuate, fall due, flow, follow, inure, issue, mature, occur, originate, proceed, progress, result from, rise from, spring, yield
Associated concepts: accrual accounting method, accrual of a cause of action, accrued benefit, accrued claims against a municipal corporation, accrued debt, accrued rights, statute of limitations, tolls
Foreign phrases: Confirmare nemo potest prius quam jus ei acciderit.No one can confirm a right before the right accrues to him.

accrue

(Increase), verb accumulate, acquire, add on, advance, aggrandize, amass, amplify, annex, appreciate, augment, become added, become greater, become larger, branch out, broaden, build, build up, collect, enlarge, expand, extend, further, gain, gather, greaten, grow, heighten, improve, intensify, mount, multiply, raise, supplement, swell, widen
Associated concepts: accrual accounting method, accrual of compensation, accrual of taxes, accrued basis, accrued costs, accrued dividend, accrued earnings, accrued income, accrued interest, accrued overtime, accrued taxes
See also: accumulate, arise, bear, compound, develop, enlarge, hoard, increase, mature, originate, redound, result, yield

accrue

(of a right or demand) to become capable of being enforced.

TO ACCRUE. Literally to grow to; as the interest accrues on the principal. Accruing costs are those which become due and are created after judgment of an execution.
     2.-To accrue means also to arise, to happen, to come to pass; as the statute of limitations does not commence running until the cause of action has accrued. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 861; 2 Rawle, 277; 10 Watts, 363; Bac. Abr. Limitation of Actions, D 3.

References in classic literature ?
Why, then you may rouse my indignation or wound my pride,' rejoined Nicholas; 'but you will not break my rest; for if the scene were acted over again, I could take no other part than I have taken; and whatever consequences may accrue to myself from it, I shall never regret doing as I have done--never, if I starve or beg in consequence.
In short, not to keep the reader in long suspense, just at the very instant when his heart was exulting in meditations on the happiness which would accrue to him by Mr Allworthy's death, he himself--died of an apoplexy.
From Theseus Oedipus craves protection in life and burial in Attic soil; the benefits that will accrue shall be told later.
if, I say, parents and masters would leave their children alone a little more, small harm would accrue, although a less quantity of as in praesenti might be acquired.
That while this Association is deeply sensible of the advantages which must accrue to the cause of science, from the production to which they have just adverted--no less than from the unwearied researches of Samuel Pickwick, Esq.
An accrual-basis taxpayer normally takes deductions for expenses in the year the item accrues.
2003-10, the Service provided guidance on the tax year in which an accrual-method vendor accrues gross income under Sec.
79-410 appropriately concludes that (under the general rule of section 461) the tax expense for CFT accrues in the "income year" on which that tax is based.
The maturity of the outstanding accrued interest, plus additional interest that accrues in the future, has been extended to September 16, 2005.
For Federal income tax purposes, the debt's conversion feature is ignored; interest accrues at the debt instrument's overall yield based on the stated interest rate and any OID.
84% and to pay associated make-whole payment premiums, and to repay the entire balance outstanding under its existing credit facility which presently accrues interest at 325 basis points over LIBOR.
451-1(a) provides that if a taxpayer improperly accrues an income amount on the basis of a reasonable estimate and subsequently determines the exact amount, the difference (if any) should be taken hat o account for the tax year in which the determination is made.