admission of evidence


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admission of evidence

n. a judge's acceptance of evidence in a trial. (See: evidence)

References in periodicals archive ?
Before the 1994 enactment of Federal Rules of Evidence 413 and 414, Indiana was the only state with a statute permitting the admission of evidence of prior sexual misconduct.
Among other topics, the participants heard from some fifteen speakers on victims' participation in the STL's proceedings and the admission of evidence before international criminal tribunals.
Separate chapters explore the interplay between admission of evidence and the confrontation right, the problem of anonymous witnesses testifying in court, in chambers hearings, and closed circuit television testimony.
exclusionary rule that bars admission of evidence produced or derived
A report by the House Research Organization said, "The bill would allow admission of evidence regarding a defendant's character, which could distract the jury from the real issue of whether the defendant actually committed the crime in question.
LEGAL COMMENTARY: When a court reviews a trial court's ruling on admission of evidence, an appellate court must acknowledge that decisions on admissibility are within the sound discretion of the trial court and will not be overturned absent an abuse of discretion or misapplication of the law.
What they say is in order to avoid confusion in the lower courts regarding the admission of evidence and what is or is not required, we're just going to go ahead and adopt this statute as a rule of procedure, so that eliminates that issue in the lower court," he said.
CASE FACTS: The defendants in this medical malpractice case sought review of two rulings concerning admission of evidence, a ruling denying a peremptory strike during jury selection, and an order allowing attorneys' fees based upon unaccepted proposals for settlement.
Grant improves upon Stillman by better respecting the section 24(2) goal of examining, in the totality of circumstances, whether the admission of evidence would bring the system of justice into long-term disrepute.
The Court went on to consider whether, in all of the circumstances, the admission of evidence which was obtained by a Charter breach would "bring the administration of justice into disrepute.
Warning of the risks of opening the door to the admission of evidence that otherwise would be inadmissible, Chicago lawyer Willis R.
21) The Court in Old Chief advanced the proposition that trial judges have complete discretion regarding the admission of evidence sought to be excluded under rule 403.