admit


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admit

v. 1) to state something is true in answering a complaint filed in a lawsuit the defendant will admit or deny each allegation in his or her answer filed with the court. If he or she agrees and states that he/she did what he/she is accused of, then the allegation need not be proved in trial. 2) in criminal law, to agree a fact is true or confess guilt. 3) to allow as evidence in a trial, as the judge says: "Exhiibit D, the letter, is admitted." (See: admission, evidence)

admit

(Concede), verb accede, accept, acknowledge, acquiesce, affirm, agree, assent, concedere, concur, confirm, declare, disclose, divulge, enlighten, expose, fateri, grant, recognize, relate, reveal, unmask, unveil
Associated concepts: admit fault, admit in a reply, admit in an answer, admit liability, admit to probate

admit

(Give access), verb adeundi copiam, admittere, allow entrance, create an opening, give right of entry to, induct, initiate, install, institute, invest, open a passage, open a path, open a road, open a route, open an entryway, open an inlet, recipere, throw open, vest, yield passage to
Associated concepts: admit to bail, admit to practice
See also: accede, acknowledge, adduce, adopt, approve, authorize, avow, bare, bear, betray, certify, concede, confess, declare, disclose, grant, induct, initiate, instate, profess, receive, recognize, reveal, submit, verify, vouchsafe, yield
References in periodicals archive ?
19), Dallas Superintendent Mike Moses admits his district is starting to confront its own dropout problem.
Ignoring, for the moment, the question of how "needs-blind" a system is that admits one-fifth of each class on the assumption that, hey, their parents might give us money, Fitzsimmons's defense doesn't quite ring true.
Fitzsimmons admits Harvard knows of no empirical research to support the claim that diminishing legacies would decrease alumni contributions, relying instead on "hundreds, perhaps thousands of conversations with alumni whose sons and daughters applied.
Henderson admits forgiveness is hard, but so is the alternative.