adopt

(redirected from adoptee)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to adoptee: adopter

Adopt

To accept, appropriate, choose, or select, as to adopt a child. To consent to and put into effect, as to adopt a constitution or a law.

adopt

v. 1) to take on the relationship of parent to child of another person, particularly (but not necessarily) a minor, by official legal action. 2) to accept or make use of, such as to adopt another defendant's argument in a lawsuit. (See: adoption)

adopt

verb accept, ad sententiam, admit, adoptare, affiliate, annex, appropriate, arrogate, assimilate, assume, attach oneself to, avail oneself of, borrow, choose, co-opt, conform to, constituere, denizenize, elect, embrace, espouse, exercise one's option, follow, foster, make one's own, naturalize, raise, seize, select, select as one's own, take, take on, take possession of, take up, try, usurp, utilize, vote to accept
Associated concepts: adopt a child, adopt a law, adopt a philosophy, legitimation, support
See also: accept, acquire, agree, apply, appropriate, approve, assume, choose, comply, copy, embrace, espouse, gain, impropriate, naturalize, pass, prefer, receive, resort, seize, select
References in periodicals archive ?
A 'foreign origin', in turn, can also refer to different things: the mere fact that the adoptee was born on non-Swedish territory by non-Swedish parents, a pre-adoption past in a country other than Sweden or the geographically foreign marks on the individual's body.
Adoptees and some groups that serve them are also spreading the word.
It's also important for the adoptee to understand how the search might affect his or her current relationships, especially with adoptive parents, partners and children.
Larry Shinagawa teaches his "Introduction to Asian American Studies" course at the University of Maryland, College Park, he finds that 10 to 20 percent of his students are adoptees.
The risk of hepatitis A infection is about 106 per 100,000 close contacts of international adoptees in the United States, and about 1.
And it is remarkable that, in a recent international meta-analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Juffer and van IJzendoorn (2005) found that the majority of intercountry adoptees in their analysis (which excluded studies exclusively of children diagnosed pre-placement as having serious problems) adjust well in their new home environments.
The Ontario government has decided that it will not appeal a court decision that struck down provisions in the Adoption Information Disclosure Act, which would have opened past and future adoption records to adoptees and birth parents seeking to find each other, Community and Social Services Minister Madeleine Meilleur announced.
The shame associated with adoption is often unrecognized by members of the adoption triad (birth parents, adoptive parents, adoptee) (Silverstein & Kaplan, 1982), yet feeling ashamed is a common feeling for adoptees (Common Clinical Issues Among Adoptees, 1995; Leon, 2002; Silverstein & Kaplan; Smith, 1993).
IT'S important to register newborns and adoptees in DEERS to establish TRICARE eligibility for well-baby and pediatric health care, and to avoid potential claims problems.
Perhaps it's because adoptees have such a range of responses from cutting ties to expressing gratitude toward their birth parents and adoptive ones.
Application numbers then settled down to a steady stream of adoptee applicants (932 in 2004) (Griffith 2004), and it seems likely that eventually applications will decline to minimal numbers.