adumbration


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to adumbration: aggrandizement

adumbration

noun blurry image, darkening, dim representation, dimming, faint resemblance, imperfect porrrayal, obfuscation, obscuration, uncertainty, vague outline
References in periodicals archive ?
Rawls's adumbration of a liberal democratic state cannot be found easily in the U.
The nearest we get to an adumbration of the opposition's case is a mention of something called "The Cult of True Womanhood," which is erroneously described as "the ideology of that era.
Purcell attempts an "anamnesis of key episodes in the human drama," which he takes to be "the persons within the cultural communities they created, who originally had at least some adumbration of the meaning of the drama of humanity, and expressed that in mythic, philosophic, revelational, ideological or post-ideological experiences" (p.
The same applies to Carling's adumbration of a Europe-to-come in thrall to a farflung bureaucracy and inhabited by people whose lives are dominated by machines.
A couple of weeks ago I made a disobliging reference to Father Theodore Hesburgh, but I lacked the space for copious adumbration of the evidence.
The new historians prefer to cloud their works with all kinds of extra-aesthetic considerations, primarily a quasi-Marxian adumbration of economic conditions which, while it has uncovered much primary material of great interest, nonetheless has created historical fantasies no less complete and perhaps even more pernicious than those it ostensibly set out to correct.
55) Adumbration is an experience of the real which exceeds our articulations of it.
The closure of the Bauhaus, the prohibition of Jazz and atonal music as "cultural Bolshevism," the touring Exhibition of Degenerate Art, and the burning of modernist paintings by the Berlin Fire Brigade (an uncanny adumbration of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451) all signaled to observers that the express train of Weimar modernism hit the buffers in 1933 with disastrous personal consequences not just for art, but also the artists who created it and the liberal intelligentsia who appreciated it.
The early novelists, their involvement in the adumbration of formal realism notwithstanding, seem deeply invested in the meta-textual.
Christopher Columbus was the reverse of Don Quixote;" Miller suggests that his journeying would arrive at nothing but an adumbration of an "American Horror.
The Eastern Arctic and RCMP Patrols (1922-1939) are also of great interest: the former contains details of annual crew complements and ports of call, while the latter is an adumbration of RCMP investigations and tours.
The trilogy can be profitably read as a vast adumbration of aspects of Ray's later cinema often ignored in monist readings that concentrate on his Chekhovian subtleties.