advertence


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Advertence is said to be "without defilement but defiling" (Patthana I.
And that discovery presupposes a methodically prior advertence to the realm of interiority.
154) Zimmerman contemplates that habitual criminal behavior is possible and concludes that in such cases, advertence is unnecessary.
1303b28-30, for advertence to the adage, "Well begun is half done.
construct a notion of what constitutes a reasonable advertence to risk
Lystra is called "twin Roman colony" (352) with no advertence to its localization supported by these words discovered on an important artifact; while the localization of Derbe--usually presumed south of Lystra but not even mentioned here--was claimed from a shard publicized around 1960 to be rather east across the highroad.
From the human being's obligatory advertence to moral norms there follows a twofold positioning of free actions vis-a-vis their rule: compliance or opposition.
s analysis is trained more on the advertence of consequences, rather than on a pure intent to kill.
He does not discuss the manuscript tradition at all, save for a passing advertence (2) to the investigations of R.
69) Chief Justice Laskin spoke of "the relativity of rights involving advertence to social purpose as well as to personal advantage.
Now it is one thing to require advertence to consciousness and its objects; but it is quite another to understand and conceive of them correctly.
According to these advertences (de Magistris 2004), my starting hypothesis is that mega-events--such as expos, Olympic Games, other sport, political and cultural events--have turned from extraordinary occasions of urban development into ordinary management practices, which lead the construction of the contemporary city.