affectation

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In the effort to subdue by dint of talking and to keep in check the mysterious, the profound attraction he felt already for that delicate being of flesh and blood, with pale cheeks, with darkened eyelids and eyes scalded with hot tears, he went on speaking of himself as a confirmed enemy of life on shore--a perfect terror to a simple man, what with the fads and proprieties and the ceremonies and affectations.
This woman with her reckless life, her odd fascination, her brusque hatred of affectations, was a constant torment to him.
Genteel blinds and makeshifts were more or less observable as soon as their doors were opened; screens not half high enough, which made dining-rooms out of arched passages, and warded off obscure corners where footboys slept at nights with their heads among the knives and forks; curtains which called upon you to believe that they didn't hide anything; panes of glass which requested you not to see them; many objects of various forms, feigning to have no connection with their guilty secret, a bed; disguised traps in walls, which were clearly coal-cellars; affectations of no thoroughfares, which were evidently doors to little kitchens.
They had music; Emma was obliged to play; and the thanks and praise which necessarily followed appeared to her an affectation of candour, an air of greatness, meaning only to shew off in higher style her own very superior performance.
Willoughby's behaviour in taking leave of them, his embarrassment,and affectation of cheerfulness, and, above all, his unwillingness to accept her mother's invitation, a backwardness so unlike a lover,so unlike himself, greatly disturbed her.
Now, look here," I said with an affectation of gravity, "if you'll tell me how you came by those things, I'll make it worth your while.
I wonder not that the restraint appears to gall you more it were for your honour to have retained the dress and language of an outlaw, than to veil the deeds of one under an affectation of gentle language and demeanour.
I bet you think I am writing all this from affectation, to be witty at the expense of men of action; and what is more, that from ill-bred affectation, I am clanking a sword like my officer.
Affectation of candour is common enough-- one meets with it everywhere.
But the "cast-anchor" trick, with its affectation of being a sea-phrase - for why not write just as well "threw anchor," "flung anchor," or 'shied anchor"?
A look of severity, or harshness even, a sort of stiffness, which, with inferiors, was pride, with superiors an affectation of superior virtue; a surly cast of countenance upon all occasions, even when looking at himself in a glass alone -- such is the exterior of this personage.
Theirs was the affectation of respectability; - if indeed there be an affectation so honorable.