affection


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affection

noun admiration, adoration, ardor, attachment, closeness, devotion, endearment, excitation of feeling, fancy, feeling, fervor, firm attachment, fondness, fullness of heart, inclination, infatuation, kindness, love, mutual attraction, partiality, passion, penchant, pietas, popular regard, proneness, regard, sentiment, sentimental attachment, sentimentality, state of excitement, tender feellng, tender passion, tenderness, understanding, warmth, zealous attachment
Associated concepts: alienation of affection
See also: affinity, benevolence, predilection, predisposition, regard

AFFECTION, contracts. The making over, pawning, or mortgaging a thing to assure the payment of a sum of money, or the discharge of some other duty or service. Techn. Diet.

References in classic literature ?
Such expressions, assisted as they were by every thing that look and manner could do, made Emma feel that she had never loved Harriet so well, nor valued her affection so highly before.
I have bidden you to join your hands," said he, "not in earthly affection, for ye have cast off its chains forever; but as brother and sister in spiritual love, and helpers of one another in your allotted task.
No; the seamen of three hundred years hence will probably be neither touched nor moved to derision, affection, or admiration.
She might scruple to make use of the words, but she must and did feel that her mother was a partial, ill-judging parent, a dawdle, a slattern, who neither taught nor restrained her children, whose house was the scene of mismanagement and discomfort from beginning to end, and who had no talent, no conversation, no affection towards herself; no curiosity to know her better, no desire of her friendship, and no inclination for her company that could lessen her sense of such feelings.
Mrs Clay's affections had overpowered her interest, and she had sacrificed, for the young man's sake, the possibility of scheming longer for Sir Walter.
It seems also more advantageous for the state, that the husbandmen should have their wives and children in common than the military, for there will be less affection [1262b] among them in that case than when otherwise; for such persons ought to be under subjection, that they may obey the laws, and not seek after innovations.
Then, moved with pity, he was seized with passion and devotion towards that child, his brother; a sweet and strange thing was a human affection to him, who had hitherto loved his books alone.
The Mother fondles one and nurtures it with the greatest affection and care, but hates and neglects the other.
Nature does not seem to have implanted in his breast one lingering feeling of affection for him, and surely she can never err.
If I had bitterly wept and deplored his lost affection, he would, perhaps, have condescended to pity me, and taken me into favour for a while, just to comfort his solitude and console him for the absence of his beloved Annabella, until he could meet her again, or some more fitting substitute.
And what fastens attention, in the intercourse of life, like any passage betraying affection between two parties?
On the contrary, that gentleman grew every day fonder of little Tommy, as if he intended to counterbalance his severity to the father with extraordinary fondness and affection towards the son.