affix

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affix

v. 1) to attach something to real estate in a permanent way, including planting trees and shrubs, constructing a building, or adding to existing improvements. The key is that affixed items are permanent and cannot be picked up and moved away like a washing machine. 2) to sign or seal, as affix a signature or a seal.

affix

verb add, adfigere, adhere, adjoin, adligare, agglutinate, annex, append, attach, bind, cohere, combine, conjoin, connect, couple, enclose, fasten, fix, insert, join, link, put together, secure, subjoin, supplement, unite
Associated concepts: affix a seal to an instrument, affix a signature, affix exhibits to a pleading, affix process to the door
See also: add, addendum, adhere, allonge, annex, append, attach, cement, cohere, combine, join, levy, rider
References in periodicals archive ?
19) The reason that standee is possible is that there is in fact only one verbal argument for the affixal argument to be coindexed with.
This is explained as follows: as claimed, the imperative verb needs to move to the MOOD head to license the affixal imperative.
All non-basic affixal (prefixed as well as suffixed) adjectives have been analysed in this research, totalling 3,356.
Its case role is determined by the following suffixes with which it occurs in the affixal string.
The Nancowrv Word: Phonology, Affixal Morphology and Roots of a Nicobarese Language.
With regard to the frequency and distribution of affixal and non-affixal negatives, Tottie observes that the higher frequency of affixal negation in written varieties of English is associated with the higher frequency of premodifying adjectives in writing.
Affixal nouns in Old English: Morphological description, multiple bases and recursivity.
Affixal variation is limited even within the grammatical cases, as only the partitive and the genitive plural endings in table 4 have multiple realizations, and even this variation is partly conditioned by metrical and phonological factors.
These figures don't tell us much, except that it is difficult to find a word-final affixal consonant with a closure, and that if we want to find evidence to back up the 2002 findings for the disjunct boundary, we'll have to look further.
This work aims at filling this gap by carrying out a complete analysis of the category, status and patterns of the bases of derivation of Old English affixal nouns.
Since the stripping away of affixal material is a normal characteristic of incorporation, such constructions are highly unusual crosslinguistically anyway; whatever their cross-linguistic status, it is clear that the addition of-kiln to the incorporated root makes it a larger prosodic unit more inclined to independent prosodic status.
Affixal variation within the regular conjugational system is thus largely confined to the patterns in table 2.