alien


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alien

1) n. a person who is not a citizen of the country. 2) in the United States any person born in another country to parents who are not American and who has not become a naturalized citizen. There are resident aliens officially permitted to live in the country and illegal aliens who have sneaked into the country or stayed beyond the time allowed on a visa. 3) v. to convey title to property.

alien

(Foreign), adjective coming from another land, external, extrinsic, foreign-born, from abroad, immigrant, imported, not domestic, not indigenous, not native, not naturalized, of foreign origin, outside, unnaturalized

alien

(Unrelated), adjective detached, different, disconnected, disjoined, disrelated, dissociated, from nowhere, inappropriate, independent, insular, no relation, not comparable, of external origin, unaffiliated, unallied, unassociated, unconnected, ungermane, unrelated, without context, without relation

alien

noun  alienigena, emigrant, étranger, expatriate, foreigner, immigrant, interloper, intruder, one excluded from some privilege, outlander, person coming from a foreign country, person from foreign parts, refugee, stranger
See also: antipathetic, apart, different, extraneous, extrinsic, foreign, impertinent, inapplicable, inapposite, inappropriate, incompatible, incongruous, irrelative, irrelevant, nonconforming, novel, obscure, peculiar, remote, repugnant, stranger, unrelated, unusual

alien

a person who is not a British citizen, a Commonwealth citizen, a BRITISH PROTECTED person or a citizen of the Republic of Ireland.

At common law, a distinction is drawn between friendly aliens and enemy aliens, with the latter comprising not only citizens of hostile states but also all others voluntarily living in enemy territory or carrying on business there; enemy aliens are subject to additional disabilities.

ALIEN, persons. One born out of the jurisdiction of the United States, who has not since been naturalized under their constitution and laws. To this there are some exceptions, as this children of the ministers of the United States in foreign courts. See Citizen, Inhabitant.
     2. Aliens are subject to disabilities, have rights, and are bound to perform duties, which will be briefly considered. 1. Disabilities. An alien cannot in general acquire title to real estate by the descent, or by other mere operation of law; and if he purchase land, he may be divested of the fee, upon an inquest of office found. To this general rule there are statutory exceptions in some of the states; in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Louisiana, New Jersey, Rev. Laws, 604, and Michigan, Rev. St. 266, s. 26, the disability has been removed; in North Carolina, (but see Mart. R. 48; 3 Dev. R. 138; 2 Hayw. 104, 108; 3 Murph. 194; 4 Dev. 247; Vermont and Virginia, by constitutional provision; and in Alabama, 3 Stew R. 60; Connecticut, act of 1824, Stat. tit. Foreigners, 251; Indiana, Rev. Code, a. 3, act of January 25, 1842; Illinois, Kentucky, 1 Litt. 399; 6 Mont. 266 Maine, Rev. St,. tit. 7, c. 93, s. 5 Maryland, act of 1825, ch. 66; 2 Wheat. 259; and Missouri, Rev. Code, 1825, p. 66, by statutory provision it is partly so.
     3. An alien, even after being naturalized, is ineligible to the office of president of the United States; and in some states, as in New York, to that of governor; he cannot be a member of congress, till the expiration of seven years after his naturalization. An alien can exercise no political rights whatever; he cannot therefore vote at any political election, fill any office, or serve as a juror. 6 John. R. 332.
     4.-2. An alien has a right to acquire personal estate, make and enforce contracts in relation to the same - he is protected from injuries, and wrongs, to his person and property, his relative rights and character; he may sue and be sued.
     5.-3. He owes a temporary local allegiance, and his property is liable to taxation. Aliens are either alien friends or alien enemies. It is only alien friends who have the rights above enumerated; alien enemies are incapable, during the existence of war to sue, and may be ordered out of the country. See generally, 2 Kent. Com. 43 to 63; 1 Vin. Ab. 157; 13 Vin. ab. 414; Bac. Ab. h.t.; 1 Saund. 8, n.2; Wheat. Dig. h.t.; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in classic literature ?
But there was no rest for the alien soul till he had made sure of the telegraph office.
He'd been a terror in his time, in Parliament and the courts, and so on; especially in that row about the aliens who were deported as undesirables, when he wanted one of 'em hanged for murder.
Murray was so extremely solicitous for the comfort and happiness of her children, and continually talking about it, she never once mentioned mine; though they were at home, surrounded by friends, and I an alien among strangers; and I did not yet know enough of the world, not to be considerably surprised at this anomaly.
Something alien had intruded into the old, perfect, school-day comradeship -- something that threatened to mar it.
There is no explaining this peculiar openness of Japan to the alien culture of the West.
The tradition was broken, the Brownon estates passed into alien hands and the only Brownons remaining in that place were underground in Oak Hill Cemetery, where, indeed, was a colony of them powerful enough to resist the encroachment of surrounding tribes and hold the best part of the grounds.
Therefore Marilla conceived it to be her duty to drill Anne into a tranquil uniformity of disposition as impossible and alien to her as to a dancing sunbeam in one of the brook shallows.
Twas an alien place, full of weird, evasive enchantment and magicry.
There is reason in supposing that the finest natures, when under alien conditions, receive more injury than the inferior, because the contrast is greater.
Peace had reigned within the tribe for weeks and no alien enemy had trespassed upon its preserves from without.
He not only disliked family life, but a family, and especially a husband was, in accordance with the views general in the bachelor world in which he lived, conceived as something alien, repellant, and, above all, ridiculous.
In this way it came to pass that those scattered linen-weavers--emigrants from the town into the country--were to the last regarded as aliens by their rustic neighbours, and usually contracted the eccentric habits which belong to a state of loneliness.