alienor


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alienor

a person who transfers property to another.

ALIENOR. He who makes a grant or alienation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Alienor Reira, the author's wife, said she helped garner ideas for the story.
Botanical Essence No15 was created using 15 different ingredients, including bourbon vanilla, by perfumer Alienor Massenet.
They were delicious, more for drinking then collecting I thought, although the Cuvée Alienor is a big serious wine that is 100% Merlot.
We also are grateful to Alienor Sonnay, Regina Uhl, Nadine RoBner, Dana Ruster, and Carolin Karnath for their technical assistance.
Alienor Harpsichord Competition: the 2000 Composition Winners.
IFF perfumers who contributed their time and expertise were: Domitille Bertier, Anne-Sophie Chapuis, Anne Flipo, Bruno Jovanovic, Sophie Labbe, Sandrine Malin, Alienor Massenet, Catherine Poensin-Stefani and Dominique Ropion.
It was 1979 when Editions Payot first published Vie, la legend, l'influence d'Alienor, comtesse de Poitou, duchesse d'Aquitaine, reine de France, puis d'Angleterre, dame des troubadours et des bardes bretons, and 2000 when they released a second French edition as Alienor d'Aquitaine.
To this extent, compliance with the construction lien law is no guarantee that alienor will be paid, just as the owner has no guarantee that construction can be completed at a total cost not exceeding the original contracted price.
The interplay of etienne and Alienor creates a powerful allegory for the creation of a post-colonial Acadie, forward looking, but conscious of its foundations.
Current associated members include Les Alienor du Vin de Bordeaux and groups from Burgundy, the Rhone, Beaujolais, Greece, Spain, Switzerland, Austria and Hungary.
As Christine and her daughter Alienor keep the household running and participate in the preliminary work, Nicolas begins to appreciate them as two more sides to womanhood: the practical wife and the vulnerable virgin.
It is difficult to find out about contemporary conventions and etiquette, but one invaluable source is Les Honneurs de la Cour, written between 1484 and 1491 by Alienor de Poitiers, the widowed Viscountess of Veurne .