Allocution

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Allocution

The formal inquiry by a judge of an accused person, convicted of a crime, as to whether the person has any legal cause to show why judgment should not be pronounced against him or her or as to whether the person has anything to say to the court before being sentenced.

See: declamation, discourse, parlance, rhetoric, speech
References in periodicals archive ?
These statements too are reflected in the allocution.
We think that the papal allocution at least has been used to support these more recent moves.
But why is a reassertion necessary, if the papal allocution and other documents did not intimate something different as a challenge?
Our point was not to make or assume the claim that the pope's allocution had such standing or that this speech in itself changed the longstanding Catholic moral tradition on end-of-life issues.
Walter, "Artificial Nutrition, Hydration: Assessing Papal Statement," National Catholic Reporter 40 (April 16, 2004) 9-10; and "Implications of the Papal Allocution on Feeding Tubes," Hastings Center Report 34 (July/August 2004) 18-20.
A third question concerns how the allocution will be implemented.
On what basis would these be granted, since the papal allocution states that such a practice would be euthanasia by omission?
The fact that this allocution is understood by many Catholic moral theologians to sit uneasily with the dominant method and basis for determining when a treatment is ordinary or extraordinary pales in comparison with the myriad of personal and institutional issues that the allocution raises.
The strict implementation of a policy such as that in the Pope's allocution seems to us simply to prolong the agony by prohibiting responsible medical and moral evaluation of the patient's condition.