sickness

(redirected from altitude sickness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
See: disability, disease, disorder, pain, prostration

SICKNESS. By sickness is understood any affection of the body which deprives it temporarily of the power to fulfill its usual functions.
     2. Sickness is either such as affects the body generally, or only some parts of it. Of the former class, a fever is an example; of the latter, blindness. When a process has been issued against an individual for his arrest, the sheriff or other officer is authorized, after he has arrested him, if he be so dangerously sick, that to remove him would endanger his life or health, to let him remain where he found him, and to return the facts at large, or simply languidus. (q.v.)

References in periodicals archive ?
But nothing will prepare me for the altitude sickness and the temperature changes.
Cooney's Antarctic exploits were made all the more remarkable when he injured his shoulder just ten days into the walk but still succeeded in hauling a 200lb sledge through fierce snowstorms, temperatures as low as minus 52C and altitude sickness at heights over 9,000ft.
With worries that she could be affected by altitude sickness as she strides out over the Andes, Kington thought that enhancing her red blood cells with the drug could be the answer.
Altitude sickness can occur, but only for the first day or two.
Altitude Sickness (Acute Mountain Sickness) - Pipeline Review, Q3 2011', provides an overview of the Altitude Sickness (Acute Mountain Sickness) therapeutic pipeline.
Preventing altitude sickness Proper acclimatisation to altitudes of about 2,500m (8,000 feet) or more is the best way to prevent it.
Suffering from altitude sickness and hallucinations which, at one stage, saw Colin engage in conversation with a rock, the pair had to endure a 13-hour round trip to complete the climb.
Although his eight-day trek to the top of the 19,341 ft summit will be a tougher affair, Dean is more worried about using a portable toilet than altitude sickness.
On Wednesday, Karsang Namgyal Sherpa, who had climbed Everest 10 times, died because of altitude sickness.
Yet even after a gruelling ordeal and a serious bout of altitude sickness, Al Fardan now has his sights set on reaching the Mount Everest base camp.
Brian, who is based at Birtley Community Fire Station, in Gateshead, has been jumping in the saddle and riding 120 to 150 miles a week to keep his up stamina levels but his biggest test to overcome will be avoiding altitude sickness.