altruistic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Johnny Murtagh, pictured after his latest Group-race success on Royal Diamond at Ascot on Saturday, will bid for a first Group 1 victory as a trainer with Altruistic at Doncaster
In all likelihood, there is considerable variation among people in the strength of their individualistic and altruistic genes.
first used in the 1960s by the American social psychologist Stanley Milgram, remains one of the best ways of measuring truly altruistic behaviour, as returning the letter doesn't benefit that person and actually incurs the small hassle of taking the letter to a post box.
Kate Clarkson, a Unite representative and Health Visitor for County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust tells CP why she became an altruistic kidney donor
We know from evidence that voluntary, altruistic and repeated blood donation is the best way for countries to ensure a safe and sufficient blood supply," said Mirta Roses, director of PAHO.
THE Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall will leave Canada today having made an altruistic gesture to the families of the country's servicemen and women.
Those who seek to justify clinical research often point to the possibility that participants in clinical trials might have altruistic motives for participating.
Nurse Barbara Ryder from Plymouth was one of the UK's first altruistic kidney donors, giving her organ to Andy Loudon, a retired carpenter from Bedfordshire, in 2007.
All it takes is one altruistic kidney donor to set off a lengthy chain of kidney transplants, doctors reported in The New England Journal of Medicine.
Dr Robert Montgomery, director of Hopkins' transplant centre and head of the transplant team, has advocated a wider system of connecting altruistic donors, transplant candidates and incompatible but willing donors to increase the number of available organs.
There are two main things we want to know about altruistic behavior.