amusement

(redirected from amusements)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
References in classic literature ?
If dancing formed the amusement of the night, they were partners for half the time; and when obliged to separate for a couple of dances, were careful to stand together and scarcely spoke a word to any body else.
I'm the rake Miss Garth means; and I want to go to another concert -- or a play, if you like -- or a ball, if you prefer it -- or anything else in the way of amusement that puts me into a new dress, and plunges me into a crowd of people, and illuminates me with plenty of light, and sets me in a tingle of excitement all over, from head to foot.
Sir, those amusements are allowed; but if your eminence wishes it, we will discontinue the permission.
And much good may be done by means of a magic lantern, or a missionary, or some popular amusement of that kind.
But I as ever partial to what is termed in the 'Young Men's Own Book'--'the society of virtuous and intelligent young ladies;' and in the absence of the mermaids, the amusement became dull and insipid.
To speak the truth, I had no especial relish for such amusement at any time, and, at that particular moment, would most willingly have declined it; for the night was coming on, and I felt much fatigued with the exercise already taken; but I saw no mode of escape, and was fearful of disturbing my poor friend's equanimity by a refusal.
The ancient amusement of shooting the Christmas turkey is one of the few sports that the settlers of a new country seldom or never neglect to observe.
One of those utterly tedious amusements one only finds at an English country house on an English country Sunday.
From eleven o'clock until luncheon, and from luncheon until dinner at six in the evening, the employments and amusements were various.
When Master Bloomfield's amusements consist in injuring sentient creatures,' I answered, 'I think it my duty to interfere.
While the terrible drama of discovery was in progress on one side of the door, trivial questions about the amusements of Venice, and facetious discussions on the relative merits of French and Italian cookery, were proceeding on the other.
He took Rebecca to task once or twice about the propriety of playing at backgammon with Sir Pitt, saying that it was a godless amusement, and that she would be much better engaged in reading "Thrump's Legacy," or "The Blind Washerwoman of Moorfields," or any work of a more serious nature; but Miss Sharp said her dear mother used often to play the same game with the old Count de Trictrac and the venerable Abbe du Cornet, and so found an excuse for this and other worldly amusements.