ancient

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Related to ancientness: Ancientry
See: antique, hereditary, obsolete, old, outdated, outmoded

ancient

having existed since before the time of legal memory (formerly fixed at 1189). See further ANCIENT DOCUMENTS, ACQUISITIVE PRESCRIPTION.

ANCIENT. Something old, which by age alone has acquired some force; as ancient lights, ancient writings.

References in periodicals archive ?
The problem of the arche-fossil cannot be equated with either spatial distance or temporal ancientness since it designates an event that is prior to givenness as such.
The content of the first folio thus fulfills an important function by providing a suggestion of ancientness, concreteness, and currency in substitution for the author-function.
They are so closely tied that the reader begins to associate the source of the Ents' power with their ancientness.
For me, the cover depicts both modernity and ancientness and succinctly embodies this exotic destination.
But whereas visual artists of the '90s straightforwardly framed "relations" that were part of the fabric of the everyday (eating, getting a massage, organizing information on a corkboard, and so on) by displacing them into the space of the gallery, Clark grafts the palpable immediacy of relational space onto the ancientness of his symbolic medium.
There was a time when the texts that we today call "literary" (narratives, stories, epics, tragedies, comedies) were accepted, put into circulation and valorized without any question about the identity of their author; their anonymity caused no difficulties since their ancientness, whether real or imagined, was regarded as a sufficient guarantee of their status.
Georgian ancientness is emphasized: the cookbook doesn't fail to note that they had an alphabet six centuries before the Russians did.
The linking of ancientness with exotic languages is, surely, something that would have appealed to Tolkien--and it may well be that it helped to inspire his conception of the testament of Isildur about the Ring, in Book II, Chapter 2 of The Fellowship of the Ring.
Third and last, I use the word "mythology" in a somewhat special sense, namely "all of the texts that one tribal narrator tells in the order the narrator arranges and tells them;" a mythology is one narrator's full oral book of ancientness.
For instance, in the case of Cape Breton tourism, if the island is rearticulated as a "seat of ancient culture," as the provincial tour guide insists, whose ancientness is being referred to?
15) In spite of the sense of ancientness or time depth that the building evokes, it is, at the same time, strikingly contemporary and, therefore, an even more appropriate representation of Native cultures.
with rarity and ancientness, its peculiar rituals, locale, and