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animal

noun animans, beast, beast of burden, beast of the field, brute, brute creation, created being, creature, pet, wild being
Associated concepts: animals of a base nature, domestic annmals, wild animal
Foreign phrases: Animalia fera, si facta sint mansueta et ex consuetudine eunt et redeunt, volant et revolant, ut cervi, cygni, etc., eo usque nostra sunt, et ita intelligunnur quamdium habuerunt animum revertendi.Wild aniials, if they are tamed, and are accustomed to leave and return, fly away and fly back, as stags, swans, etc., are connidered to belong to us so long as they have the intention of returning to us.

ANIMAL, property. A name given to every animated being endowed with the power of voluntary motion. In law, it signifies all animals except those of the him, in species.
     2. Animals are distinguished into such as are domitae, and such as are ferae naturae.
     3. It is laid down, that in tame or domestic animals, such as horse, swine, sheep, poultry, and the like, a man may have an absolute property, because they continue perpetually in his possession and occupation, and will not stray from his house and person unless by accident or fraudulent enticement, in either of which cases the owner does not lose his property. 2 Bl. Com. 390; 2 Mod. 319. 1.
     4. But in animals ferae naturae, a man can have no absolute property; they belong to him only while they continue in his keeping or actual possession; for if at any they regain their natural liberty, his property instantly ceases, unless they have animum revertendi, which is only to be known by their usual habit of returning. 2 Bl. Com. 396; 3 Binn. 546; Bro. Ab. Propertie, 37; Com. Dig. Biens, F; 7 Co. 17 b; 1 Ch. Pr. 87; Inst. 2, 1, 15. See also 3 Caines' Rep. 175; Coop. Justin. 457, 458; 7 Johns. Rep. 16; Bro. Ab. Detinue, 44.
     5. The owner of a mischievous animal, known to him to be so, is responsible, when he permits him to go at large, for the damages he may do. 2 Esp. Cas. 482; 4 Campb. 198; 1 Starkie's Cas. 285; 1 Holt, 617; 2 Str.1264; Lord Raym. 110; B. N. P. 77; 1 B. & A. 620; 2 C. M.& R. 496; 5 C.& P. 1; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 187. This principle agrees with the civil law. Domat, Lois Civ. liv. 2, t. 8, s. 2. And any person may justify the killing of such ferocious animals. 9 Johns. 233; 10. Johns. 365; 13 Johns. 312. The owner, of such an animal may be indicted for a common nuisance. 1 Russ. Ch. Cr. Law, 643; Burn's Just., Nuisance, 1.
     6. In Louisiana, the owner of an animal is answerable for the damage he may cause; but if the animal be lost, or has strayed more than a day, he may discharge himself from this responsibility, by abandoning him to the person who has sustained the injury; except where the master turns loose a dangerous or noxious animal; for then he must pay all the harm done, without being allowed to make the abandonment. Civ. Code, art. 2301. See Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
He said it was obvious that animal medicines must be sensibly regulated but the UK's current registration system was sufficient for the task.
In 2005 the Office of Fair Trading ruled that vets should lose their monopoly on the sale of a number of animal medicines, paving the way for other retailers, including pharmacies, to sell them.
The availability of animal medicines is vital to farmers to enable them to care properly for stock.
On May 9, General Manager of Shijiazhuang Huaxing Animal Medicine Co.
The Animal Health Alliance warned yesterday that proposed changes to European animal medicine regulations could mean a vet's prescription could be needed for routine activities.
The EU proposals on veterinary medicinal products would prevent the sale of animal medicines for farm livestock and horses without a prescription.
The staff have now been trained by AMTRA, an independent regulatory body whose task is to ensure that the marketing and distribution of animal medicines in the UK is undertaken in a responsible manner by AMTRA qualified persons.
OFFICERS from Glamorgan NFU met to discuss their concerns over a European Union recommendation to introduce new legislation for animal medicines requiring all veterinary medicines administered for foodproducing animals to be dispensed by prescription.
It is a disgrace that at a time when the farming industry in this country is on its knees, our farmers are still paying what could be described as extortionate prices for essential animal medicines.
Larry Miller, Phibro president, Animal Health, said, "These standards represent a significant step forward by adding another safeguard for consumers and removing any concern for producers that the use of virginiamycin-based animal medicines could limit export options to the European Union.
The qualification, from the Animal Medicines Training Regulatory Authority (AMTRA), means he is able to give advice on feed, prescribe medicines and devise animal health plans for farm animals, equine and companion animals.

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