Antinomy

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Antinomy

An expression in law and logic to indicate that two authorities, laws, or propositions are inconsistent with each other.

See: inconsistency, opposition, paradox

ANTINOMY. A term used in the civil law to signify the real or apparent contradiction between two laws or two decisions. Merl. Repert. h.t. Vide Conflict of Laws.

References in periodicals archive ?
In its antinomic romantic fashion it attests to the grandeur of what it, and what poetry' itself in this analysis, can never represent or sign for.
She sees in this history the realization of the antinomic element of messianism transformed into program of political action, both destructive and self-destructive.
Paul's description of his sinfulness, his inability to will the good, and his antinomic embrace of faith.
They construct the couple not as an antinomic relation (woman versus man), but as an association, an indivisible entity in a family or kinship system.
Synecdochically, then, this doubleness or dividedness corresponds to the antinomic sides of HCE, antinomies that each have antinomies of their own.
However, with the death of Deeriye, who fails to reconcile the two antinomic elements of the gun and the rosary, an entire world, with its way of living, of being, and of dying, is extinguished.
The best source of illustrations is Fallon's article, The Ideologies of Federal Courts Law,(35) where he surveys a range of issues bearing on the allocation of authority between federal and state courts and concludes that "federal courts law is contradictory and unstable at its foundations, because it credits the antinomic premises of the Federalist and Nationalist models and oscillates between them.
Indeed, these antinomic beliefs are actually detrimental to secular society, and - at the risk of receiving a fetus in the mail-I must say that Davidians and Catholics have a logically equivalent basis for their beliefs, which is Kierkegaardian irrationalism.