apartness


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For subsets X and Y of A we say that set X is set-set apartness from Y, and it is denoted by X[?
This apartness helps you see things not only creatively, but also humorously--and Jews are disproportionately represented in humor.
The refusal by Anglophone leaders to belong to a political entity they neither recognize as theirs, nor perceive as providing them the full benefits of integration, resulted in the politics of "separateness and apartness.
Of course, this spatial apartness accomplishes the fundamental colonial project of erecting artificial boundaries between colonial over-lordship and its subjugated others, executing a social stratification and cultural hierarchization based on power and racial relations.
It was in the domain of associating with the opposite sex--dating, courtship and marriage--that the young people related that their apartness from their Canadian peers was most felt.
7) The local reaction to Schultze's musical impulsiveness confirms his apartness from an exclusionary Heimat "rooted in that intolerance of difference, that fear of the 'other'" (Morley and Robins 26).
Sanders (2002:11) argues that the relationship between intellectuals and apartheid needs to be "deciphered, not by fixing on apartness alone, but by tracking interventions, marked by degrees of affirmation and disavowal, in a continuum of foldedness or responsibility-in-complicity".
As a child, he wrote in his autobiography, he felt "an aching sense of lonely apartness from others".
They have "their own apartments" at Mansfield Park (151)--and true apartness becomes natural to them.
She set herself apart, defined that apartness and then sought to reintegrate herself into her chosen milieu.
describe their isolation or ostracization from the gay or queer community, and their sense of apartness from the world of "heterosexual privilege" in which many gays and lesbians have thought them to be seeking refuge.