appall

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But thou, King Minos, art thou not thyself appalled, who, year after year, hast perpetrated this dreadful wrong, by giving seven innocent youths and as many maidens to be devoured by a monster?
Richard paused and looked at the speaker, a little astonished at the language, and a good deal appalled at the refusal.
Adam, appalled, drew his wife to him and held her close.
Alice Rutherford for scarce a three months, and it was the thought of taking this fair young girl into the dangers and isolation of tropical Africa that appalled him.
He had become an omnivorous reader, and the world of possibilities that were opened to him in this seat of culture and learning fairly appalled him when he contemplated the very infinitesimal crumb of the sum total of human knowledge that a single individual might hope to acquire even after a lifetime of study and research; but he learned what he could by day, and threw himself into a search for relaxation and amusement at night.
Tarzan explained briefly, but when he turned to the woman for confirmation of his statement he was appalled by her reply.
He was appalled at the problem confronting him, weighted down by the incubus of his working-class station.
And yet, let me add finally, never have I been so appalled and shocked by the world's cruelty as have I been appalled and shocked in the midst of happy, laughing, and applauding audiences when trained-animal turns were being performed on the stage.
He walked with a certain swing of the shoulders which appalled the timid.
It was only when Anna had left his house, and the English governess sent to ask him whether she should dine with him or separately, that for the first time he clearly comprehended his position, and was appalled by it.
He put both his hands out as if to ward off the reproach of a defiling truth; and, instantly, the appalled conclave of unreal men, standing about mutely beyond the clear lustre of mirrors, made at him the same gesture of rejection and horror.
Master Charles Bates, appalled by Sikes's crime, fell into a train of reflection whether an honest life was not, after all, the best.