appetite


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to appetite: appetite suppressant, Loss of appetite
References in classic literature ?
They probably fancied that my sole object -- and, indeed, the sole object for which a sane man could ever put himself into voluntary motion -- was to get an appetite for dinner.
Coles, who would force themselves anywhere; neither could she feel any right of preference herself she submitted, therefore, and only questioned Miss Bates farther as to her niece's appetite and diet, which she longed to be able to assist.
He made up his mind to eat less, but unfortunately it was not possible to carry out this brilliant idea when he wakened each morning with an amazing appetite and the table near his sofa was set with a breakfast of home-made bread and fresh butter, snow-white eggs, raspberry jam and clotted cream.
So he took a chop by the bone in one hand, and a potato in the other, and ate away with a very good appetite, to my extreme satisfaction.
I speak not of the finicking joy of the gourmet, but the joy of an honest appetite in ecstasy, the elemental joy of absorbing quantities of fresh simple food,--mere roast lamb, new potatoes, and peas of living green.
The said Earl thinking himself greater than any king in those quarters, determined to have that whole benefice (as he hath divers others) to pay at his pleasure ; and because he could not find sic security as his insatiable appetite required, this shift was devised.
Only in this island of Luggnagg the appetite for living was not so eager, from the continual example of the STRULDBRUGS before their eyes.
The goatherds did not understand this jargon about squires and knights-errant, and all they did was to eat in silence and stare at their guests, who with great elegance and appetite were stowing away pieces as big as one's fist.
And if he could expect to prolong his honors by his good conduct, he might hesitate to sacrifice his appetite for them to his appetite for gain.
He was accompanied by Captain Stewart, the amateur traveller; who had not yet sated his appetite for the adventurous life of the wilderness.
This grief for his home, which overcomes so many married seamen, did not deprive Captain MacW- of his legitimate appetite.
What you call healthy appetite I feel as Hunger's savage tooth: And, when no dinner is in sight, The dinner-bell's a sound of ruth!