archetype

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42) Archetypically, the symbolic transformation of the Japan Defence Agency into a Ministry of Defence "naturally creates doubts about 'Japan engaging once again on the old road of military expansion"".
The question I would pose is how such an archetypically melancholic narrative mediates a real situation of precariousness in which our ability to pursue research is freighted down by the continual, energy-exhausting effort of productive quantification and justification.
In this character we start with the very archetypically macho, very shut-off outsider, this male who gradually becomes more and more involved and vulnerable and to be able to play that on film in such a big scale movie I was thrilled with.
In this character we start with the very archetypically macho, shut off outsider, who gradually becomes more and more involved and vulnerable.
The classic view of witches, archetypically illustrated by the only known representation of Geillis Duncan playing the Jew's harp for James VI of Scotland, is of wizened old hags.
In addition to fragmented images of women's feet in high-heeled shoes, busts of female heads, and a wall painting that resembled an '80s homage to Eva Hesse (made by spray-painting through a fishing net), there was a series of drawings of prostitutes posing in archetypically alluring attitudes.
11) Hamilton conceived of that energy, consciously or not, as an archetypically male attribute.
Understood archetypically, the bodhisattvas present psychological and spiritual resources for enlightened awareness, activity, and ways of living.
One might speculate that their participation was not unconnected to the ways in which this archetypically modern war was presented to Benjamin's contemporaries as the only truly world-changing event in which ordinarily powerless individuals like themselves might get to take responsibility for, and potentially alter, the course of history--a responsibility that they were never offered, indeed were actively denied, in times of peace.
What grows out of these seemingly amusing tidbits is a serious discussion of women's studies in architecture, and the impact of feminism on this archetypically male discipline.
perhaps his dead mother, perhaps leadership, or God, or an escape from a demanding agrarian existence, plagued by drought and fatigue--the archetypically mixed motivation of the [male] hero's quest since the dawn of mythology.