argued


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See: alleged
References in classic literature ?
It makes me feel strong when I play and the wind comes over the moor," argued Mary.
Stryver, a man of little more than thirty, but looking twenty years older than he was, stout, loud, red, bluff, and free from any drawback of delicacy, had a pushing way of shouldering himself (morally and physically) into companies and conversations, that argued well for his shouldering his way up in life.
Spenlow smiled as I became modestly warm on the subject, and then argued this question with me as he had argued the other.
Perhaps they replied, or argued the point, or tried to encourage me to believe that I was better than I thought.
I was born a native of these parts,'' answered their guide, and as he made the reply they stood before the mansion of Cedric; a low irregular building, containing several court-yards or enclosures, extending over a considerable space of ground, and which, though its size argued the inhabitant to be a person of wealth, differed entirely from the tall, turretted, and castellated buildings in which the Norman nobility resided, and which had become the universal style of architecture throughout England.
If the mutineers succeeded in crossing the stockade, he argued, they would take possession of any unprotected loophole and shoot us down like rats in our own stronghold.
He argued, "that the very laws of nature absolutely required we should have been made, in the beginning of a size more large and robust; not so liable to destruction from every little accident, of a tile falling from a house, or a stone cast from the hand of a boy, or being drowned in a little brook.
Here they stood and argued behind some enormous "properties.
In my youth,' said his father, `I took to the law, And argued each case with my wife; And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw, Has lasted the rest of my life.
At the same time I argued the matter briefly in my own mind, saying to myself, 'I shall not be the first who has risen through marriage from a lowly to a lofty station, nor will Don Fernando be the first whom beauty or, as is more likely, a blind attachment, has led to mate himself below his rank.
The citizens of America have too much discernment to be argued into anarchy.
These stern logicians argued that if he were not dead his burns would warn him to find a safer place.