argument


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Argument

A form of expression consisting of a coherent set of reasons presenting or supporting a point of view; a series of reasons given for or against a matter under discussion that is intended to convince or persuade the listener.

For example, an argument by counsel consists of a presentation of the facts or evidence and the inferences that may be drawn therefrom, which are aimed at persuading a judge or jury to render a verdict in favor of the attorney's client.

An attorney may begin to develop an argument in the Opening Statement, the initial discussion of the case in which the facts and the pertinent law are stated. In most cases, however, an attorney sets forth the main points of an argument in the closing argument, which is the attorney's final opportunity to comment on the case before a judge or jury retires to begin deliberation on a verdict.

argument

(Contention), noun altercation, belligerency, bickering, breach, clashing, conflict, contentiousness, controversy, cross-purposes, debate, difference of opinion, disaccord, disagreement, discord, disputation, dispute, dissension, dissent, disunion, disunity, division, divisiveness, feud, hard feelings, hostility, ill feeling, ill will, lack of concord, opposition, oral contention, polemics, quarrel, quarreling, strife, variance, verbal conflict, war of words, wrangle, wrangling
Associated concepts: a posteriori, a priori, apex juris
Foreign phrases: In rebus manifestis, errat qui auctoritates legum allegat; quia perspicua vera non sunt probanda.In clear cases, he errs who cites legal authorities because obbious truths are manifest and do not have to be proved. Argumentum ab inconvenienti est validum in lege; quia lex non permittit aliquod inconveniens. An argument drawn from what is inconvenient is good in law, because the law will not permit any inconvenience.

argument

(Pleading), noun argument at the bar, counterstatement, course of reasoning, defense, discourse designed to convince, disputation, expression of opinion for or against, plea, pleading, rationale, refutation, statement of defense, statement offered in proof, statement tending to prove a point, submission
Associated concepts: argument submitted to the court, clossng argument, equittable argument, legal argument, opennng argument, oral argument, preargument statement
Foreign phrases: In rebus manifestis, errat qui auctoriiates legum allegat; quia perspicua vera non sunt probanda.In clear cases, he errs who cites legal authoriiies because obvious truths are manifest and do not have to be proved.
See also: altercation, basis, brief, conflict, confrontation, contest, contravention, disaccord, disagreement, discourse, disparity, dispute, dissent, dissidence, item, persuasion, pleading, point, reason, remonstrance, rift, thesis

ARGUMENT, practice. Cicero defines it ii probable reason proposed in order to induce belief. Ratio probabilis et idonea ad faciendam fidem. The logicians define it more scientifically to be a means, which by its connexion between two extremes) establishes a relation between them. This subject belongs rather to rhetoric and logic than to law.

References in classic literature ?
Indeed hath he," answered the magistrate; "and hath adduced such arguments, that we will even leave the matter as it now stands; so long, at least, as there shall be no further scandal in the woman.
Was it not honestly a trial to listen to an argument such as that?
Now, listen to me, Mary, and I can state to you a very clear argument, to show--"
There was argument on his side -- and the bulk of the advantage -- so I judged it best to humor him.
The minister gave out his text and droned along monotonously through an argument that was so prosy that many a head by and by began to nod -- and yet it was an argument that dealt in limitless fire and brimstone and thinned the predestined elect down to a company so small as to be hardly worth the saving.
Cobb saw that he had taken the wrong tack, but he was too unused to argument to explain himself readily, so he drove away, trying to think by what safer word than "lively" he might have described his interesting little passenger.
Whether this prophecy is ever fulfilled or not, it is nevertheless plain that a very different-looking class of people are springing up at the south, and are now held in slavery, from those originally brought to this country from Africa; and if their increase do no other good, it will do away the force of the argument, that God cursed Ham, and therefore American slavery is right.
The executioner's argument was, that you couldn't cut off a head unless there was a body to cut it off from: that he had never had to do such a thing before, and he wasn't going to begin at HIS time of life.
But against all this it may be urged that it is easier to reward two thousand soldiers, for the former may be remunerated by giving them places, which must perforce be conferred upon men of their calling, while the latter can only be recompensed out of the very property of the master they serve; but this impossibility only strengthens my argument.
Shall I return to your old argument about the opinions of men?
Allowing the case, however, to stand according to your representation, you must remember, Miss Bennet, that the friend who is supposed to desire his return to the house, and the delay of his plan, has merely desired it, asked it without offering one argument in favour of its propriety.
Though he did not drink himself, with a politeness of which Philip recognised the irony, he put a couple of bottles of beer at Hayward's elbow, and he insisted on lighting matches whenever in the heat of argument Hayward's pipe went out.