argumentation

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argumentation

noun analysis, argument, conflict, contention, contentiousness, controversy, crittcal examination, dialectic, dialogue, disaccord, disceptation, discord, disputation, dispute, dissension, logical synthesis, patter n of reasoning, polemics, quarrelsomeness, ratiocination, wrangling
Associated concepts: instructions to the jury, reargument, rebuttal, summation, surrebuttal
See also: argument, conflict, contention, controversy, dialectic, disaccord, disagreement, discord, discourse, dissension, ratiocination
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, he presents one more arbitrary scheme for allocating ownership of persons and asserts, without argumentation, that to argue for it does not involve him in a performative self-contradiction--even though his scheme cannot apply to the standard case of person-to-person argumentation and offers no strategy for argumentatively resolving the determination of its critical variables (n and [sigma]).
Murphy's and Gene Callahan's Critique of Hans-Hermann Hoppe's Argumentation Ethics.
1) Hoppe was not the first to note that argumentation ethics can serve to justify the core principles of the Western tradition of law: personal freedom, private property, contract, and personal accountability to be assessed in a public process of free and informed argumentation.
Argumentation in spoken discourse, as a special spoken genre, can be seen as one type of speech event; however, it is also independent of speech events, as indicated by Hymes (1972): Genres often conclude with speech events, but must be treated as analytically independent of them.
Because the oral argumentation genre discussed in this article is also situated in the academic English context, these studies should be able to shed light on the current investigation.
The analytical framework developed within SFL was drawn on for this article, as it not only addresses argumentation elements such as thesis and evidence but also "distinguishes between one-sided arguments (exposition) and two or more-sided arguments (discussion)" (Coffin, 2004, p.
Degree of immediacy: Refers to the extent by which argumentations were anchored in the "here and now" (as in "You don't do it well, do like me") or moved toward a more distant or abstract course (as in "We need rules to know what to do").
Degree of certainty: Refers to the extent by which argumentations were assertively formulated (as in "You promised and you don't keep your word.
In this article I shall focus on the argument from argumentation (6) itself rather than on its implications for political economy.
The key to understanding the argument from argumentation is, first, that when they are told or asked (not) to believe, say, or do something people are likely and in fact entitled to question why they ought (not) to believe, say, or do it; and second, that an exchange of arguments is a justificatory argumentation only if all the participants acknowledge certain facts and abide by certain norms--norms that no one can argue are invalid because adherence to those norms is a necessary condition of engaging in argumentation.
The VLD-ATCK mechanism reached over 30% of progress, which means that more than 30% of the refuting argumentations managed to be validated by the tutor.
The argumentation model employed by AMANDA extends the classical argumentation models (Eemeren & Grootendorst, 1984; Karacapilidis, Papadias, & Gordon, 1996; Simari, 1989; Chesnevar, 2000) by introducing the notion of "multi-issue, multiparty argumentative discussions.